Blues The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1290.html Sun, 23 Jun 2024 10:27:59 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Jimmy Witherspoon - Goin' To Kansas City Blues (1957) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1290-jimmy-whiterspoon/24018-jimmy-witherspoon-goin-to-kansas-city-blues-1957.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1290-jimmy-whiterspoon/24018-jimmy-witherspoon-goin-to-kansas-city-blues-1957.html Jimmy Witherspoon - Goin' To Kansas City Blues (1957)

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1 	The Jumpin' Blues 	3:03
2 	Until The Real Thing Comes Along 	2:47
3 	Hootie Blues 	3:20
4 	Rain Is Such A Lonesome Sound 	3:16
5 	Confessin' The Blues 	4:15
6 	Piney Brown Blues 	5:29
7 	Froggy Bottom 	2:36
8 	Gee Baby, Ain't I Good To You 	3:17
9 	Blue Monday 	3:40
10 	Ooh Wee, Then The Lights Go Out 	2:55
+
11 	Cloudy 	3:15
12 	Fare Thee, Honey, Fare Thee Well 	3:33
13 	Ride On 	3:30

Jimmy Witherspoon (vocals)
Jay McShann Band
- Jay McShann (piano)
- Ray Copeland (trumpet)
- J. C. Higginbotham (trombone)
- Hilton Jefferson (alto sax)
- Seldon Powell (tenor sax)
- Haywood Henry (baritone sax)
- Kenny Burrell (guitar)
- Gene Ramey (double bass)
- Mousey Alexander (drums) 

 

Jimmy Witherspoon was a blues shouter from Arkansas-Jay McShann a piano player from Oklahoma. McShann settled in Kansas City and founded a band featuring a young Charlie Parker. In 1944, Witherspoon was hired as the singer for McShann's band (several years post-Parker) and from there, his career blossomed. After a four years with McShann, Witherspoon left and found brief success as a solo artist. However, by the 50's, the shouter style had run it's course and Witherspoon was thin on material and interest in his music.

Witherspoon cut this album in 1957 with McShann as somewhat of a reunion and somewhat as an attempt to comeback for both artists. It's a pretty mellow affair and despite that Witherspoon's shouting was well placed in jazz circles, he tones it down here. That's not to say it's not a good album or that he doesn't still belt it out (see "Blue Monday Blues"), but just a relaxed feel to the album. There are some great tunes written by Parker and McShann way back when. There's also 5 1/2 minute rendition of Joe Turner's Piney Brown Blues which is phenomenal and pays tribute to Witherspoon's idol Joe Turner, as well as making a solid tribute to Kansas City.

Further, you got to love this cover, right? The Union Station was still a working train depot. Just a lot to look over and find what's still there and what's changed. ---kclawrencevinyl.blogspot.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Jimmy Witherspoon Sat, 01 Sep 2018 13:12:34 +0000
Jimmy Witherspoon – The Blues Singer (1969) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1290-jimmy-whiterspoon/16303-jimmy-witherspoon-the-blues-singer-1969.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1290-jimmy-whiterspoon/16303-jimmy-witherspoon-the-blues-singer-1969.html Jimmy Witherspoon – The Blues Singer (1969)

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A1 	Evening		3:09
A2 	I Don't Know		2:58
A3 	No Rolling Blues		4:03
A4 	Going Down Slow		4:59
B1 	Pay The Consequence		3:07
B2 	Just A Dream		3:52
B3 	Blow Wind Blow		4:00
B4 	Look At Granny Run, Run		3:00
B5 	Nobody Wants To Hear Nobody's Trouble	3:35

Jimmy Witherspoon – guitar, vocals
Danny Kalb, Harvey Mandel – guitar
Charley Musselwhite – harmonica
Barry Goldberg, Brother Jack McDuff – organ
Johnny Pate – arranged by, conductor

 

Blues Master Jimmy Witherspoon was born August 8, 1920, Gurdon, Ark. and passed away on September 18, 1997, in Los Angeles, Ca. His father, a railroad man, sang in local choirs, while his mother played piano. Spoon didn't pursue music professionally until after his WWII stint in the Merchant Marines. On his return to the states in 1944, he replaced the great Walter Brown in Jay McShann's band and performed with Big Joe Turner and T-Bone Walker. Spoon's first hit record was "Ain't Nobody's Business" which he followed in 1949 with a reworking of the Leroy Carr song "In The Evening When The Sun Goes Down". His hit "Ain't Nobody's Business" was one of the biggest records of the era, and stayed on the Billboard charts 34 weeks that year. Spoon made at least 200 recordings since and was one of the few true giants of the post-war Blues boom. He recorded for a variety of labels through the 50s, including cornerstone sides with Swingtime, Federal, Chess, RCA and even a Dixieland session with The Wilbur De Paris New Orleans Jazz Band for Atlantic in 1956. Spoon's long-running career took place on Jazz stages around the world, from Carnegie Hall to the Newport Jazz Festival, from touring Japan with Count Basie to European tours with Buck Clayton's All Stars. Spoon managed to span the worlds of Blues, R&B and Jazz with his deep baritone and unique style anchored in the big band Blues traditions.

In 1963 Spoon recorded "Evenin' Blues" with T-Bone Walker and in 1968 recorded "The Blues is Now" with his brother, organist Jack McDuff. The 70's Spoon met Robben Ford and brought him to the attention of Spoon's management firm, the same team that handled Eric Burdon and War at the time, Spoon sang on the 1971 Eric Burdon album "Guilty", and toured with Burdon. Spoon's 1975 Capitol Records recording "Love Is A Five Letter Word", made the best-selling charts. He made records for labels like Blue Note and Fantasy. He cut a remarkable 1986 album "Midnight Lady Called The Blues", written and produced by Dr. John and Doc Pomus. He re-teamed with guitarist Robben Ford in the early 90s for "Live At The Notodden Blues Festival", and cut a 1992 album "The Blues, The Whole Blues and Nothin' But The Blues" for Indigo Records. Spoon's last recording "Spoon's Blues" for Stony Plain Records featured Duke Robillard and his band with special guest Long John Baldry. ---amazon.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Jimmy Witherspoon Tue, 15 Jul 2014 08:46:48 +0000
Jimmy Witherspoon – Tougher Than Tough (1997) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1290-jimmy-whiterspoon/10600-jimmy-witherspoon-tougher-than-tough-1997.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1290-jimmy-whiterspoon/10600-jimmy-witherspoon-tougher-than-tough-1997.html Jimmy Witherspoon – Tougher Than Tough (1997)

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1. Time's Getting Tougher Than Tough - 3:03
2. How Long Blues - 3:25
3. Corrina, Corrina - 3:21							play
4. C.C. Rider - 4:45
5. Roll 'Em Pete - 4:27
6. Everyday - 2:46
7. I'm Gonna Move To The Outskirts Of Town - 3:48
8. Kansas City - 3:15								play
9. Trouble In Mind - 3:28
10. St. Louis Blues - 3:49
11. In Blues - 3:31
12. Loser's Blues - 2:15
13. Please Send Me Someone To Love - 2:28
14. Life's Highway - 2:25
15. Cry The Blues - 2:25
16. Out Blues - 2:07

Bass – Leroy Vinnegar, Jimmy Bond
Drums – Mel Lewis, Frank Butler
Guitar - Herman Burell Mitchell
Piano – Jimmy Rowles, Paul Moer
Organ - Richard 'Groove' Holmes
Saxophone – Ben Webster, Gerry Mulligan
Vocals – Jimmy Witherspoon

 

Following the master of ceremonies' introductory remarks, Witherspoon kicks off the medium up 'Time's Gettin' Tougher Than Tough' as drummer Lewis lays down a solid foundation beneath him. Webster solos with Lewis' booting phrases backing him. 'Spoon comes in once more for a second vocal, then, after a series of stop-time breaks, winds things up.

Jimmy Rowles' soulful introduction catches the spirit of the slow, mournful 'How Long blues'. Mulligan moves in behind Witherspoon's vocal then goes for himself, his big horn digging deep into the blues. When 'Spoon takes the mike again, Webster noodles in the background until all concerned take it out.

'Corina-Corina' finds The Tailor laying out the time on top cymbal, riding along behind the vocal, then digging in behind Webster's romping, barking and grunting solo with a rolling eight-beat. As Witherspoon resumes, Jimmy Rowles fills the gaps with piano commentary as the horns riff on to the final chorus.

A slow roll from Mel and 'Spoon launches into the classic 'C. C. Rider' with Webster in background first, then Mulligan murmuring on the second chorus. "Shoot that man, Catch that cannon-ball," 'Spoon exhorts. Then Mulligan enters to play a thoughtful and meaningful solo that must be considered by many his best blues playing on record. After a throbbing Witherspoon cries, "Where did you stay last night?" both horns ride on to the coda.

'Roll 'Em Pete' is up tempo and jumping. Webster riffs behind the vocal, then embarks on his solo with 'Spoon urging him on. Another vocal, then Jimmy announces "Leroy Vinnegar," and the bassist takes a solo. The Tailor takes two solo choruses with Witherspoon announcing his name and after a final vocal it's "Bye, bye." Next kicks off in walking tempo with Rowles bringing in 'Spoon with an oddly happy lament, belting out 'Every Day'. Webster's fine gutty solo concludes with a funky trill to bring in the next vocal chorus.

As both horns ride along behind the singer, it's another rideout ending. On the 'Outskirts of Town' finds Witherspoon soulful and down. Webster comes in behind him to commiserate, then is joined by Mulligan's second voice and both horns moan in sympathy. Ben now breathes the blues all alone before 'Spoon re-enters to enunciate the risque but probably realistic lyric before concluding. 'Goin' To Kansas City' is a jumpin', walkin' reminiscence about "standin' on the corner 12th street and Vine." Mulligan double-times his solo for two choruses, then straight-times his third. 'Spoon speaks out again with the rhythm section belting him on in a real KayCee groove. 'Trouble In Mind', yet another classic, is lamented by the singer with Webster telling his own story in background. Mulligan solos in almost lyric vein, and 'Spoon calls his name. The singer sums up the message by almost groaning, "Gonna lay my head on some lonesome railroad track . . ."

Witherspoon's fervent "Ahh-men" brings in W. C. Handy's 'St. Louis Blues' with Webster blowing strongly behind him. The Tailor slides into fast tango rhythm on the verse before Ben comes back with a preacher almost guttural in character. Leroy walks a chorus before 'Spoon returns for a final outing with Webster's tenor rooting him home. --- John Tynan.

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Jimmy Witherspoon Sat, 22 Oct 2011 18:39:03 +0000
Jimmy Witherspoon and Robben Ford - Live at the Notodden Blues Festival 1992 http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1290-jimmy-whiterspoon/9914-jimmy-witherspoon-and-robben-ford-live-at-the-notodden-blues-festival-1992-.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1290-jimmy-whiterspoon/9914-jimmy-witherspoon-and-robben-ford-live-at-the-notodden-blues-festival-1992-.html Jimmy Witherspoon and Robben Ford - Live at the Notodden Blues Festival 1992

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01. Doodlin' 6:22   
02. Going Down Slow 5:14   
03. Some Of My Best Friends 3:18   
04. Outskirts Of Town 4:21   
05. See See Rider 5:25				play   
06. Pretty Woman 6:06   
07. Ain't Nobody's Business 6:38	play  
08. Patche Patche 4:56   
09. Wonderful World 3:46  
10. Walkin' By Myself 3:05   
11. Big Legged Woman 3:24

Line-Up:
Robben Ford- Guitar 
Jimmy Witherspoon- Vocals 
Patrick Ford- Drums 
Espen Fjelle- Organ 
Stan Poplin- Bass

 

That's how Robben describes Jimmy Witherspoon but the same could be said of Mr Ford. while 'spoon's vocal talents are severely diminished here, his back up group positively cooks. The rhythm section is tight, the B3 player (whose name obviously eludes 'spoon -"give it to HIM!") is tasty and Robben is clearly inspired. He has that unique combination of intelligence, feel, tone and swing and clearly knows how to support the singer and the song. The performance is a little more measured than it is raw but Robben's choices are so perfect, it's impossible to find fault. Despite the game but less-than-stellar performance by Jimmy Witherspoon, this set delivers big time. ---William Nollman.

 

This performance by Robben Ford and Jimmy Witherspoon should be listened to in conjunction with their earlier performance when Robben Ford was just 18 or so (The cd is Live and is available here).For my money Robben Ford´s playing on the earlier cd is more interesting and more vital.He's never been one to play much with pentatonics but even when he does you can feel something.With Jimmy Witherspoon singing its a great pairing. --- Wylie Spicer.

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Jimmy Witherspoon Tue, 02 Aug 2011 08:51:26 +0000
Jimmy Witherspoon - Some of My Best Friends Are the Blues 1964 http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1290-jimmy-whiterspoon/4536-jimmy-witherspoon-some-of-my-best-friends-are-the-blues-1964.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1290-jimmy-whiterspoon/4536-jimmy-witherspoon-some-of-my-best-friends-are-the-blues-1964.html Jimmy Witherspoon - Some of My Best Friends Are the Blues (1964)

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01.Some Of My Best Friends Are The Blues
02.Everytime I Think About You
03.I Never Will Marry
04.I Wanna Be Around
05.Teardrops From My Eyes
06.And The Angels Sing
07.Who's Sorry Now
08.I'm Comin' Down With The Blues
09.You're Next
10.Happy Blues
11.That's Why I'm Leaving
12.One Last Chance
Conductor, Arranged By – Benny Golson Vocals – Jimmy Witherspoon
Recorded in Stockholm, Sweden, July 15-20, 1964

 

Jimmy Witherspoon is accompanied by a large orchestra arranged by Benny Golson for a set emphasizing slow tempos (even on "And the Angels Sing" and "Who's Sorry Now"), ballads and blues. Nothing all that memorable occurs, but the singer is in strong voice, and his fans will want to pick up this interesting CD reissue. ---Scott Yanow, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Jimmy Witherspoon Wed, 12 May 2010 12:12:41 +0000
Jimmy Witherspoon - Blues Around The Clock (1963) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1290-jimmy-whiterspoon/4535-jimmy-witherspoon-blues-around-the-clock-1963.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1290-jimmy-whiterspoon/4535-jimmy-witherspoon-blues-around-the-clock-1963.html Jimmy Witherspoon - Blues Around The Clock (1963)

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01. I Had A Dream [0:02:35.57]
02. Goin' to Chicago Blues [0:02:22.73]
03. No Rollin' Blues [0:04:46.40]
04. You Made Me Love You [0:02:46.56]
05. My Babe [0:01:52.44]
06. S. K. Blues [0:03:53.69]
07. Whose Hat Is That [0:02:45.53]
08. Around The Clock [0:03:19.20]
09. He Gave Me Everything [0:03:06.57]
10. Goin' Down Slow [0:02:45.56]

Jimmy Witherspoon (vocals)
Paul Griffin (organ)
Chauncey "Lord" Westbrook (guitar)
Leonard Gaskin (bass)
Herbie Lovelle (drums)

 

Veteran singer Jimmy Witherspoon (who bridges the gap between jazz and blues) mostly sticks to the latter on this spirited set. His backup group (organist Paul Griffin, guitarist Lord Westbrook, bassist Leonard Gaskin and drummer Herbie Lovelle) is fine in support, but the spotlight is almost entirely on Witherspoon throughout these ten concise performances, only one of which exceeds four minutes. Highlights include "No Rollin' Blues," "S.K. Blues" and "Around the Clock." Witherspoon is in fine voice and, even if nothing all that memorable occurs, the music is enjoyable. ---Scott Yanow, allmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Jimmy Witherspoon Wed, 12 May 2010 11:54:53 +0000
Jimmy Witherspoon - Evenin' Blues (1963) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1290-jimmy-whiterspoon/4096-jimmy-witherspoon-evenin-blues-2007.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1290-jimmy-whiterspoon/4096-jimmy-witherspoon-evenin-blues-2007.html Jimmy Witherspoon - Evenin' Blues (1963)

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1. Money's Getting Cheaper [2:47]
2. Grab Me a Freight [3:43]
3. Don't Let Go [2:47]
4. I've Been Treated Wrong [3:25]
5. Evenin' [2:40]
6. Cane River [2:30]
7. How Long Blues [2:46]
8. Good Rockin' Tonight [2:40]
9. Kansas City [3:03]
10. Drinking Beer [2:13]

Jimmy Witherspoon - vocals, T-Bone Walker - electric guitar, Clifford Scott – flute, sax, Bert Kendrix – organ, piano, Clarence Jones - bass, Wayne Robertson - drums.

 

A good, relaxed (but not laid-back) session, and one of his bluesier ones, with organ, Clifford Scott (who played on Bill Doggett's "Honky Tonk") on sax, and T-Bone Walker on guitar. Nothing too adventurous about the song selection, including well-traveled items like "Good Rockin' Tonight" and "Kansas City," but Witherspoon sings them with ingratiating soul, reaching his peaks on his cover of "Don't Let Go" (perhaps better than the hit version by Roy Hamilton) and the late-night ambience of the title track. --- Richie Unterberger, allmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Jimmy Witherspoon Tue, 30 Mar 2010 20:20:31 +0000
Jimmy Witherspoon - Blues for Easy Livers (1966) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1290-jimmy-whiterspoon/3673-jimmy-witherspoon-blues-for-easy-livers-1966.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/1290-jimmy-whiterspoon/3673-jimmy-witherspoon-blues-for-easy-livers-1966.html Jimmy Witherspoon - Blues for Easy Livers (1966)

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1. Lotus Blossom
2. Gee Baby, Ain't I Good to You
3. Travelin' Light
4. P.S. I Love You
5. I'll Always Be in Love With You
6. Don't Worry 'Bout Me
7. Easy Living
8. Embraceable You
9. Blues in the Night
10. Trouble in Mind
11. How Long Will It Take for Me to Become a Man
12. I Got It Bad (And That Ain't Good)
Jimmy Witherspoon (vocals, guitar); Pepper Adams (baritone saxophone); Bill Watrous (trombone); Roger Kellaway (piano); Mel Lewis (drums).

 

Blues for Easy Livers album by Jimmy Witherspoon was released Jan 30, 2007 on the Original Blues Classics label. Despite the title, this actually leans considerably further to the jazz side of Witherspoon's muse than the blues one, with backing by Pepper Adams on baritone sax, Roger Kellaway on piano, Bill Watrous on trombone, Richard Davis on bass, and Mel Lewis on drums. Blues for Easy Livers songs The songs, too, are much more in the jazz/pop vein than the blues/jazz one, heavy on standards by the likes of Johnny Mercer, the Gershwins, and Ellington. Blues for Easy Livers album Witherspoon's one of the masters of closing-time bluesy jazz, and he doesn't let anyone down on that account on this relaxed (but not sleepy) session. Blues for Easy Livers CD music.--- Richie Unterberger, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Jimmy Witherspoon Sun, 28 Feb 2010 12:04:27 +0000