Blues The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/3231.html Sun, 29 Jan 2023 15:19:41 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Jack White - Live On The Garden Bowl Lanes 1999 (2013) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/3231-jack-white/16586-jack-white-live-on-the-garden-bowl-lanes-1999-2013.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/3231-jack-white/16586-jack-white-live-on-the-garden-bowl-lanes-1999-2013.html Jack White - Live On The Garden Bowl Lanes 1999 (2013)

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1. Intro. Commercial Snippet
2. Dead Leaves and the Dirty Ground
3. Isis
4. Do
5. The Same Boy You've Always Known
6. Union Forever
7. Now Mary
8. Black Jack Davey
9. I Threw It All Away
10. Ain't It a Shame

Jack White - vocals, guitar
Kevin Peyok - bass
Ben Blackwell - drums
Brendan Benson – guitar

 

A live LP capturing a 1999 show by short-lived White Stripes-precursors Jack White & the Bricks, who performed on a stage set up over lanes 11 through 14 at Detroit's Garden Bowl bowling alley. Pressed on (what else) "Bowling-Pin-White" vinyl, the record features White singing and playing guitar with his nephew and Dirtbombs member Ben Blackwell on drums, Ken Peyok from Waxwings and the See-See providing bass, and future Raconteurs collaborator Brendan Benson helping out with guitar. --- discogs.com

 

I’m not here to trounce Jack White and The Bricks; there are still some quality merits that have to be discussed. For one thing, the vinyl presentation is quite striking. The bowling pin white inspired vinyl is dead on. The sticker pressed on the B side also adds to the bowling charade with its duel red stripes. The jacket here properly adds to the theme further with it dead ringer bowling alley font. As for the music, there is nothing egregious here, just restrictive. Like I said, it’s a standard live affair with a lot of the gems being the cover songs. The history of the tracks is very interesting and caught me a bit off guard. “Dead Leaves and the Dirty Ground”, “The Same Boy You’ve Always Known”, “The Union Forever”, and “Now Mary” are all by the numbers and lack much of White’s signature showmanship and improvisation skills. The wow factor comes from all these tracks being on The White Stripes White Blood Cells (2001) 2 years later. Both Bob Dylan covers, “Isis” and “I Threw It All Away” are fun a delivered with classic Jack White tact mixed with Dylan’s thick singer/songwriter poetic justice waft that encompass all his tracks. A disappointment, is the short length of signature traditionally arranged Dylan ballad “Black Jack Davey”; during the recording process something must not of transferred correctly. During other White performances this track is usually blown out and exaggerated to a very effective degree. A cute addition, final and rocking cover “Ain’t it a Shame” by ? And The Mysterians is dedicated to a girl having surgery-that girl is Meg White.

Maybe I was overly critical, maybe I let high expectations and anticipation get the better of me. I am really happy to have Jack White and The Bricks: Live on the Garden Bowl Lanes exclusively pressed on white wax. This is a record that you get the feeling that they did the best with what they had. In a historical context, being recorded about 13 years ago then being restored and pressed on vinyl is about as cool as you can get. Musically speaking, there are bursts of energy that culminate from live shows but at points on the record the players seem to lack identity. I never thought that we would find a band that could restrict Jack White but sadly The Bricks might just be those guys on this day back in 1999. ---Christopher Tahy, thefirenote.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Jack White Wed, 24 Sep 2014 15:33:07 +0000
Jack White - Blunderbuss (2012) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/3231-jack-white/12106-jack-white-blunderbuss-2012.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/3231-jack-white/12106-jack-white-blunderbuss-2012.html Jack White - Blunderbuss (2012)

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01 – Missing Pieces
02 – Sixteen Saltines
03 – Freedom at 21
04 – Love Interruption
05 – Blunderbuss		play
06 – Hypocritical Kiss
07 – Weep Themselves to Sleep
08 – I’m Shakin’
09 – Trash Tongue Talker
10 – Hip (Eponymous) Poor Boy		play
11 – I Guess I Should Go to Sleep
12 – On and On and On
13 – Take Me with You When You Go

Jack White – lead vocals, guitars, piano, bass guitar, drums, Rhodes, guitar case, clapping
Carla Azar – drums, maracas, percussion, shaker , clapping 
Emily Bowland - clarinet, bass clarinet (4)
Bryn Davies - upright bass, clapping 
Karen Elson - backing vocals
Joey Glynn - upright bass 
Adam Hoskins - acoustic guitar (11)
Olivia Jean - clapping, drums, acoustic guitar, electric guitar
Daru Jones - drums, tambourine (9)
Fats Kaplin – fiddle, mandolin (10), pedal steel (5 - 12 )
Patrick Keeler - drums (12)
Ryan Koenig - backing vocals (11)
Pokey LaFarge - mandolin, backing vocals (11)
Jack Lawrence - bass guitar ( 9)
Laura Matula - backing vocals (8, 12, 13 )
Jake Orrall - electric guitar (9)
Lillie Mae Rische - fiddle (13)
Brooke Waggoner - Fender Rhodes (13), Hammond B3 (), piano (5, 6, 7, 10, 12), Wurlitzer piano (4)

 

Having recently divorced his wife of six years, it's tempting to interpret Jack White's debut solo album as his very own version of Dylan's breakup classic, Blood on the Tracks. After all, with its bruised, scabrous lyrics – full of nosebleeds, burst lips, missing limbs and pummelled digits – and preoccupation with love gone not so much bad as cataclysmic, it sounds as though the erstwhile White Stripe has been eviscerated by his loss.

But it's important to remember that, not only was the split apparently amicable (his ex sings back-up on three songs here), but that White has never been a confessional songwriter in the conventional sense. Despite his deep devotion to the blues – that most ‘authentic’ of musical genres – he's a conceptual art-rocker at heart, inhabiting his own unique crossroads between theatrical artifice and bloody-minded sincerity.

There's a sense throughout Blunderbuss – trust him to choose such an archaic weapon – that White is positively revelling in the role of the wronged lover. So you never get the sense that he's being entirely serious; he's too eccentric and machismo-camp to suggest otherwise. It's what defines him as an artist and it's why he may be the only great rock superstar of recent years.

While this isn't a major musical reinvention, it certainly develops his trademark synthesis of stripped-back garage-rock and Americana. Despite his guitar God reputation, White – ever the contrarian – relegates his axe to a supporting role, favouring instead a sort of aquatic country-blues dominated by Rhodes electric piano and the punk-Liberace glissandos of pianist Brooke Waggoner. She's part of a small group of musicians who never detract from White's minimalist aesthetic – Meg may be gone, but the primal rhythms remain – and who hit upon a particularly delightful sound on the breezily Kinks-esque Hip (Eponymous) Poor Boy and the compact mini-opera Take Me With You When You Go.

During those moments when White's guitar does come to the fore, it fits and squalls as though it's having a breakdown, although he still swaggers with the best of them on the likes of Sixteen Saltines and on a raucous cover of Little Willie John's jittery hoodoo, I'm Shakin'.

After all these years, there's still nobody quite like him. ---Paul Whitelaw, BBC Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Jack White Thu, 26 Apr 2012 16:08:37 +0000