Blues The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853.html Thu, 29 Sep 2022 02:42:30 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Johnny Winter - Second Winter (1969) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853-johnnywinter/26293-johnny-winter-second-winter-1969.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853-johnnywinter/26293-johnny-winter-second-winter-1969.html Johnny Winter - Second Winter (1969)

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A1 	Memory Pain 	5:27
A2 	I'm Not Sure 	5:18
A3 	The Good Love 	4:38
B1 	Slippin' And Slidin' 	2:43
B2 	Miss Ann 	3:04
B3 	Johnny B. Goode 	3:45
B4 	Highway 61 Revisited 	5:07
C1 	I Love Everybody 	3:50
C2 	Hustled Down In Texas 	3:31
C3 	I Hate Everybody 	2:35
C4 	Fast Life Rider 	7:05

Bass – Tommy Shannon (tracks: A1, A2, B1 to C4)
Percussion – "Uncle" John Turner
Piano, Organ, Harpsichord, Alto Saxophone – Edgar Winter
Vocals, Guitar, Mandolin – Johnny Winter 

 

Johnny's second Columbia album shows an artist in transition. He's still obviously a Texas bluesman, recording in the same trio format that he left Dallas with. But his music is moving toward the more rock & roll sounds he would go on to create. The opener, "Memory Pain," moves him into psychedelic blues-rock territory, while old-time rockers like "Johnny B. Goode," "Miss Ann," and "Slippin' and Slidin'" provide him with familiar landscapes on which to spray his patented licks. His reworking of Dylan's "Highway 61 Revisited" is the high spot of the record, a career-defining track that would remain a major component in his set list to the end of his life. ---Cub Koda, allmusic.com

 

The leaves hadn’t even started turning red in Texas in late October 1969 when Beaumont-born bluesman Johnny Winter released Second Winter, arguably the pinnacle of his long and storied career.

Technically speaking, this was the guitar great's "third Winter," if you take into account 1968's Progressive Blues Experiment, which was released by Austin’s tiny Sonobeat Records before Winter signed with the mighty Columbia -- a label so powerful, it evidently had no qualms about revising historical accounting.

Either way, the talented six-string phenom grasped this opportunity and let loose a powerful display of fret prowess across all three vinyl sides of Second Winter. As anyone with a prized original copy, or a long memory, can tell you, the album was released as a rare three-sided set, the product of an inspired Nashville recording session that yielded too much great material to be pared down into a regular two-sided LP but not quite enough for a four-sided double.

So, rather than short-change fans or themselves, Winter and his bandmates -- bassist Tommy Shannon (who later joined Stevie Ray Vaughan’s Double Trouble), drummer Uncle John Turner and keyboard-and-sax-playing little brother Edgar -- released the bulk of the sessions and left side four blank.

Winter starts it all off by showing off his soulful voice on a cover of Percy Mayfield’s "Memory Pain," before he surrenders the spotlight to Edgar’s nimble keys on the self-penned "I’m Not Sure." It wraps with a strangling of his Gibson Firebird’s neck on Dennis Collins’ "The Good Love."

Side two, somewhat surprisingly, turns into an old-time ‘50s rock 'n' roll dance party, as Winter wails his way across classics like "Slippin’ and Slidin"’ and "Miss Ann" (both made famous by Little Richard), and Chuck Berry’s ripping "Johnny B. Goode." ---ultimateclassicrock.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Johnny Winter Sat, 04 Jan 2020 16:34:17 +0000
Johnny Winter - Paradise Blues (2018) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853-johnnywinter/24311-johnny-winter-paradise-blues-2018.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853-johnnywinter/24311-johnny-winter-paradise-blues-2018.html Johnny Winter - Paradise Blues (2018)

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1    Sen-Sa-Shun
2    You’re Humbuggin’ Me
3    Third Degree
4    Got to Find My Baby
5    You Can’t Judge a Book by Its Cover
6    Mojo Boogie
7    Shake Your Money Maker
8    Let the Good Times Roll
9    Ain’t That Just Like a Woman
10    Rumble
11    Don’t Take Advantage of Me
12    Okie Dokie Stomp

Johnny Winter - guitar, vocals
Tom Compton - drums
Jeff Ganz - bass, vocals

Live at the Paradise Theatre, Boston, MA; December 13, 1991.

 

Legendary blues musician Johnny Winter died in his hotel room in Zurich, Switzerland, on July 16th, 2014 at age 70. There are plenty of reasons why that’s notable — Winter was one of the first blues rock guitar virtuosos, releasing a string of popular and fiery albums in the late Sixties and early Seventies, becoming an arena-level concert draw in the process — but it’s the barest facts that remain the most inspiring.

Johnny Dawson Winter, who was born on February 23rd, 1944 in little Beaumont, Texas, afflicted with albinism and 20/400 eyesight in one eye and 20/600 in the other, made an iconic life for himself by playing the blues.

What are the odds of that story coming true? What levels of self-belief, resilience and talent did it take to transform those biographical details — one could easily imagine, say, Thomas Pynchon conjuring them for a character (The whitest blues guitarist! Named Johnny Winter!) — into the stuff of a legendary career? A huge break came for him in December of 1968, when fellow blues guitar great Michael Bloomfield invited him to sing and play a song during a Bloomfield and Al Kooper concert at the Fillmore East in New York. Bloomfield introduced him with the words: “This is the baddest motherfucker.”

Winter was that, no doubt, but also a testament to the idea that with a lot of skill and dedication and more than a little luck, music can open any door.

In Mary Lou Sullivan’s entertaining biography, Raisin’ Cain, Winter, whose brother was multi-instrumentalist Edgar Winter (of “Frankenstein” fame), explained that, “Growin’ up in school, I really got the bad end of the deal. People teased me and I got in a lot of fights. I was a pretty bluesy kid.” That alienation, he believed, gave him a kinship with the black blues musicians he idolized. “We both,” he explained, “had a problem with our skin being the wrong color.”

He and his younger Edgar – both born with albinism – appeared as a duo on a local children’s show in the mid 50s, singing songs and playing ukulele. By the time Johnny was 15 he had formed a band, Johnny and the Jammers, and released “School Day Blues” on a local Houston record label. Also in these early days he sometimes sat in with Roy Head and the Traits when they performed in the Beaumont area. In 1967, Johnny recorded a single with the Traits, “Tramp” backed with “Parchman Farm” and in 1968, he released his first album The Progressive Blues Experiment.

It’s probably overly romantic to say that one can hear any sort of outsider’s howl in Winter’s playing, which first came to wider attention via a 1968 Rolling Stone article that praised him for some of the most “gutsiest, fluid guitar you ever heard,” but at its best, there’s a beautifully articulated flamboyance to his music. Faster and flashier than his blues god contemporary Eric Clapton, Winter’s musicianship — a hyperactive, high-octane intensity was his great blues innovation — had the electric flair of someone who was determined to take charge of how he was seen by others. It was as if his playing (and his gutsy singing) was a challenge to audiences. Okay, you’re looking at me? Then watch this.

As a concert draw and big-seller, Winter peaked in by the mid-Seventies. (New listeners should start with 1969’s Second Winter; this year’s True To The Blues compilation is comprehensive.) But stepping out of stardom’s spotlight gave him the opportunity to do his most valuable work, as a steward to the music that changed his life. Starting in 1977, Winter produced a trio of swaggering, earthy albums for blues genius Muddy Waters, of which Hard Again is the first and best. Those albums reconnected Waters with his own greatness — Muddy’s prior Seventies albums had been uninspired — and delivered him a late-in-life critical and commercial triumph. After Waters died in 1983, Winter, who by then had already inspired followers like his fellow Texan Stevie Ray Vaughan, settled into a journeyman’s role, releasing albums at a steady pace and touring even more frequently than that. It wasn’t always an easy ride— there were struggles with addiction and duplicitous management — but it was as good, and honorable, as a blues musician can ask for. They wouldn’t be called the blues if everything was rosy.

When he wasn’t on the road, Winter, who, it must be said, cut a striking figure on-stage up through his last gigs, spent his time with his wife at home in rural Connecticut, and was able to bask in the respect of fellow musicians, a testament to the truth that if you give your being to the music you love, the music can turn that being into a remarkable life. His now-posthumous upcoming release, Step Back, is due out in September and features appearances from Clapton, ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons, Ben Harper, Dr. John, Aerosmith’s Joe Perry and others. They all knew what Winter meant.

Towards the end of Raisin’ Cain, Winter is asked how he’d liked to be remembered. He answered, simply, “As a good blues player.” Johnny Winter was much more than that. ---rockandrollparadise.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Johnny Winter Thu, 01 Nov 2018 17:05:40 +0000
Johnny Winter - The Progressive Blues Experiment (1968/2005) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853-johnnywinter/21473-johnny-winter-the-progressive-blues-experiment-19682005.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853-johnnywinter/21473-johnny-winter-the-progressive-blues-experiment-19682005.html Johnny Winter - The Progressive Blues Experiment (1968/2005)

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1 	Rollin' And Tumblin' 	
2 	Tribute To Muddy 	
3 	I Got Love If You Want It 	
4 	Bad Luck And Trouble 	
5 	Help Me 	
6 	Mean Town Blues 	
7 	Broke Down Engine 	
8 	Black Cat Bone 	
9 	It's My Own Fault 	
10 	Forty-Four

Johnny Winter - guitars (acoustic, electric and slide), harmonica, mandolin, vocals
Tommy Shannon - bass guitar
Uncle John Turner - drums, percussion

 

Although his early Columbia albums brought him worldwide stardom, it was this modest little album (first released on Imperial before the Columbia sides) that first brought Johnny Winter to the attention of guitarheads in America. It's also Winter at the beginning of a long career, playing the blues as if his life depends on it, without applying a glimmer of rock commercialism. The standard classic repertoire here includes "Rollin' and Tumblin'," "I Got Love if You Want It," "Forty-Four," "It's My Own Fault," and "Help Me," with Winter mixing it up with his original Texas trio of Red Turner on drums and Tommy Shannon (later of Stevie Ray Vaughan's Double Trouble) on bass. A true classic, this is one dirty, dangerous, and visionary album. The set was issued in a sonically screaming 24-bit remastered edition on CD by Capitol in 2005. It contains no bonus tracks, but it leaves the original crummy CD issue in the dust. ---Thom Jurek, AllMusic Review

 

This album was a demo at one time, like any other album. However, there was a distinct difference with this particular recording in comparison to your every day studio demo. Unbelievably, this Johnny Winter classic blues-rock recording was sitting around collecting dust while Winter had already established himself as a star. It saw the light of day after the fact, but now, and rightfully so, Capitol Records has remastered and re-released this pearl.

It was titled Progressive Blues Experiment for a reason, remember now, this was 1969, a pivotal year for rock music in general. The sound Winter created was his own, after many years of endless study of all the old blues players and making his fingers bleed he came up with what is now know as the Texas Blues sound. Songs that were normally only fit for the old black blues players that had completed their rites of passage, found a home with Johnny’s guitar and vocal treatments. He does not waste any time giving a nod to his influences, as the second track is his "Tribute to Muddy." The all-time classic "Black Cat Bone" is one of the very best versions I have ever heard. He does it with all the heart and soul one person could possibly muster.

What makes this album such a gem is that the sound is so clean, well, so is Winter’s guitar playing. He sounded like a man in his element, right on the cusp of taking the world by storm, which in fact he was. This certainly was not the turning point in Winter’s career, it was just the beginning. This album would be a very special initiation to a sound that would become a unique blues-rock stamp that most anyone would find difficult to duplicate.

All 10 tracks are strong and feature the Winter style in good light. This was a glimpse of what was to come. This album sounds like the building blocks of Second Winter, which also received the remaster treatment this year, and it sounds incredible. The new Legacy edition features the entire album and some live tracks with the band at their peak, so pick that one up too. This is killer white boy blues beyond compare. It is all Johnny, plain and simple, so do not miss it. If you already have it, get it again, you will not believe how good it sounds now. --- Morrice Blackwell, jazzreview.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Johnny Winter Tue, 18 Apr 2017 10:24:25 +0000
Johnny Winter - Johnny Winter (1969) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853-johnnywinter/18277-johnny-winter-johnny-winter-1969.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853-johnnywinter/18277-johnny-winter-johnny-winter-1969.html Johnny Winter - Johnny Winter (1969)

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1.I'm Yours And I'm Hers 	4:27
2.Be Careful With A Fool 	5:15
3.Dallas 	2:45
4.Mean Mistreater 	3:53
5.Leland Mississippi Blues 	3:19
6.Good Morning Little School Girl 	2:45
7.When You Got A Good Friend 	3:30
8.I'll Drown In My Tears 	4:44
9.Back Door Friend 	2:57

Johnny Winter - lead guitar, slide guitar, harp, vocals
Tommy Shannon - bass
"Uncle" John Turner – drums
+
Willie Dixon – acoustic bass (4)
Walter "Shakey" Horton – harp (4)
Edgar Winter – alto saxophone (6), piano (8)
Stephen Ralph Sefsik – alto saxophone (8)
A. Wynn Butler – tenor saxophone (6, 8)
Norman Ray – baritone saxophone (8)
Karl Garin – trumpet (6, 8)
Carrie Hossell, Elsie Senter, Peggy Bowers – backing vocals (8)

 

Winter's debut album for Columbia was also arguably his bluesiest and best. Straight out of Texas with a hot trio, Winter made blues-rock music for the angels, tearing up a cheap Fender guitar with total abandon on tracks like "I'm Yours and I'm Hers," "Leland Mississippi Blues," and perhaps the slow blues moment to die for on this set, B.B. King's "Be Careful with a Fool." Winter's playing and vocals have yet to become mannered or clichéd on this session, and if you've ever wondered what the fuss is all about, here's the best place to check out his true legacy. ---Cub Koda, allmusic.com

 

How impressive was Johnny Winter just before he cut this album, his Columbia debut? Columbia's then-president, Clive Davis, shelled out a then-record.... bonus to sign the gangling albino with the slick fingers and the hotrod blues. Small wonder Imperial Records couldn't wait to get the set Winter and his then-rhythm section (future Double Trouble bassist Tommy Shannon and drummer Uncle John Turner) had just finished laying down, the remarkable "Progressive Blues Experiment," out onto the racks at about the same time.

Winter opened up the industry's eyes in the first place when friend and fan Mike Bloomfield urged him onstage at the Fillmore East during a SuperSession show with Al Kooper; Winter played for about fifteen minutes and flattened the place cold. His Columbia debut gives you ample enough reason why, but it was way far more than just the randiest bloozeguitar jerkoff of the year - this guy was going deeper than the average string strangler.

He doesn't even have a guitar in his hands, for example, when he delivers a very soulful cover of Ray Charles's "I'll Drown In My Own Tears," and he's one Texan who had the Chicago blues esthetic down cold, the evidence here being "Mean Mistreater," which features two titans of the Chicago style, bassist Willie Dixon and harmonica virtuoso (when he kept himself straight, anyway) Big Walter Horton. And when he switches to acoustic resonator guitar for his own "Dallas," a skippy-whippy piece which pays a debt to Texas legend Blind Lemon Jefferson, Winter's just as much in his element as when he's rat-racing the electric fretboard. Likewise with his cover of Robert Johnson's "When You Got A Good Friend," his guitar playing simpler but deeper, and his vocal at once reverent and soulful.

Yet when he does rat-race it, he's not just spraying fast and loose with no direction home. Those arpeggiated runs and machine-gun licks are so tightly controlled some accused Winter of scripting himself only too cleverly by half. Not so, though you might well understand why a lot of people didn't quite know what hit them when hearing "I'm Yours and I'm Hers" and "Be Careful With A Fool," the former his own composition, the latter a once-obscured B.B. King number. Winter was no Johnny-come-lately, and not just because he'd slogged the Southwest blues bars for almost half his young life to this point, either. He proved it on his next Columbia issue, in spades... ---BluesDuke, amazon.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Johnny Winter Tue, 18 Aug 2015 16:31:54 +0000
Johnny Winter - Midsummer Blizzard (1984) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853-johnnywinter/18246-johnny-winter-midsummer-blizzard-1984.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853-johnnywinter/18246-johnny-winter-midsummer-blizzard-1984.html Johnny Winter - Midsummer Blizzard (1984)

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1. Introduction Blues
2. Don't Take Advantage of Me
3. Mad Dog
4. I Smell Trouble
5. Jumpin' Jack Flash
6. Johnny B. Goode

Johnny Winter (guitar, vocals), 
John Paris (bass),
Tom Compton (drums)

Live at the Montreux Festival, Switzerland 1984

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Johnny Winter Wed, 12 Aug 2015 15:52:43 +0000
Johnny Winter with Muddy Waters - Live at the Tower Theatre 1977 http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853-johnnywinter/18199-johnny-winter-with-muddy-waters-live-at-the-tower-theatre-1977.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853-johnnywinter/18199-johnny-winter-with-muddy-waters-live-at-the-tower-theatre-1977.html Johnny Winter with Muddy Waters - Live at the Tower Theatre 1977

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Disc 1:
01 - Hideway
02 - Cotton Gin
03 - Last Night
04 - See See Baby
05 - Rocket
06 - How Long
07 - Slow Blues
08 - Done Got Over it
09 - Crosscut Saw
10 - Talk to Your Daughter
11 - Band Intros

Disc 2:
01 - Muddy Intro
02 - Hoochie Coochie Man
03 - Blow Wind Blow
04 - Walkin' Through the Park
05 - Deep Down in Florida
06 - Blues Had a Baby
07 - I Can't Be Satisfied
08 - Trouble No More
09 - Howlin' Wolf
10 - Mannish Boy
11 - Got My Mojo Workin'
12 - Oh Baby

Johnny Winter - guitar and vocals
Muddy Waters - guitar and vocals
James Cotton - harmonica and vocal
Charles Capice - bass
Willie Smith - drums
Bob Margolin - guitar
Pinetop Perkins - piano

 

Probably one of the best shows to be shared here this month, Johnny Winter and band on the first disc and Johnny with Muddy Waters on disc two, both accompanied with fantastic musicians as James Cotton on harp for example.

Caught live at the Tower Theater, Philadelphia, on March 6, 1977.

 

After playing "Rock and Roll" for several years, in 1977 Johnny Winter returns to his musical roots: playing the real blues. His stage shows become calmer; he ceased to jump around from one side of the stage to the other; while playing rough guitar riffs. Now he remains seated, close to the mike. For recordings he uses the notorious all metallic self-made John Velano guitar with the thin silver neck.

 

Muddy about Johnny : 'Cause see, Johnny, he loves me, because he learned a lot of things under my music. He likes me personally as a friend. So when he heard that we wanted him to produce the record and all -- Man, that was just what he wanted. It's like a little family thing we got. So we did good over there. This is the fourth one out, and we done won three Grammy awards. Every one we put out, we win. This might be the one this time, who knows.

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Johnny Winter Mon, 03 Aug 2015 15:50:44 +0000
Johnny Winter - Step Back (2014) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853-johnnywinter/16504-johnny-winter-step-back-2014.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853-johnnywinter/16504-johnny-winter-step-back-2014.html Johnny Winter - Step Back (2014)

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1. Unchain My Heart - Johnny Winter
2. Can't Hold Out (Talk To Me Baby) - Johnny Winter with Ben Harper
3. Don't Want No Woman - Johnny Winter with Eric Clapton
4. Killing Floor - Johnny Winter with Paul Nelson
5. Who Do You Love - Johnny Winter
6. Okie Dokie Stomp - Johnny Winter with Brian Setzer
7. Where Can You Be - Johnny Winter with Billy Gibbons
8. Sweet Sixteen - Johnny Winter with Joe Bonamassa
9. Death Letter -Johnny Winter
10. My Babe - Johnny Winter with Jason Ricci
11. Long Tall Sally - Johnny Winter with Leslie West
12. Mojo Hand - Johnny Winter with Joe Perry
13. Blue Monday - Johnny Winter with Dr. John

Johnny Winter - Guitar, Vocals
Wendy Brown-Rashad - Vocals (Background)
Eric Clapton - Featured Artist, Guitar
Tom Curiale - Drums
Meredith DiMenna - Vocals (Background)
Mike DiMeo - Hammond B3, Piano
Dr. John - Featured Artist, Piano
Billy Gibbons -Featured Artist, Guitar
Ben Harper - Featured Artist, Slide Guitar, Vocals
Don Harris - Trumpet
Shauna Jackson - Vocals (Background)
Frank Latorre - Harp
Tom "Bones" Malone - Trombone
Lou Marini - Sax (Tenor)
Joe Meo - Sax (Alto)
Paul Nelson - Featured Artist, Fills, Guitars, 
Joe Perry - Featured Artist, Guitar
Jason Ricci - Featured Artist, Harp
Brian Setzer - Featured Artist, Guitar
Scott Spray - Bass
Cynthia Tharpe 	- Vocals (Background)
Leslie West - Featured Artist, Guitar

A celebration of the traditional blues music and early rock and roll that Johnny was raised on, Step Back was recorded with a star-studded list of musical guests, including Eric Clapton, Ben Harper, Billy Gibbons, Joe Perry, Dr. John, Leslie West, Brian Setzer, and Joe Bonnamassa. “If there's good people, other good musicians, people enjoy it. I just love it," says Winter. "Step Back is just to bring it to the people of today who haven't listened to the old music. It's better than anything they hear today." --- guitarplayer.com

 

Stepping into the role of a whirlwind albino electric blues guitar player from Texas with a brilliant slide style and a roaring voice was the very role Johnny Winter was born to fill. He released nearly 30 albums of blues and blues-rock in his 40-plus-decade career, and delivered countless memorable concerts as well. His death in the summer of 2014 at the age of 70 left an unfillable void in the international blues community. Step Back is his final studio album, and it follows his 2011 release Roots in paying tribute to his various blues influences, and, like Roots, it is essentially a series of duets with all-star guests, with Eric Clapton, Ben Harper, Billy Gibbons, Joe Perry, Dr. John, Leslie West, Brian Setzer, and Joe Bonnamassa helping out this time around. Produced by Winter's guitarist, Paul Nelson, the album is full of gritty, soaring guitar, the kind of straightforward blues-rock style Winter has always been known for, and it's obvious over his last two albums that Winter still found joy and excitement in it all, and he went out playing perhaps as well as he ever had, having learned the nuances of these classic blues songs inside and out. Highlights here include versions of Lightnin' Hopkins' "Mojo Hand" (with Aerosmith's Joe Perry), Bobby Bland's "Don't Want No Woman" (with Eric Clapton), Fats Domino's "Blue Monday" (with Dr. John), and Gatemouth Brown's "Okie Dokie Stomp" (with Brian Setzer), and even with all the guests, it's still Winter's show. Nothing here is innovative or particularly startling, though, but it's all solid, and it's comforting to know that Winter went out in peace with the blues and his legacy, and most importantly, without his skills diminishing. ---Steve Leggett, allmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Johnny Winter Mon, 08 Sep 2014 15:15:53 +0000
Johnny Winter - Still Alive And Well (1973) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853-johnnywinter/14927-johnny-winter-still-alive-and-well-1973.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853-johnnywinter/14927-johnny-winter-still-alive-and-well-1973.html Johnny Winter - Still Alive And Well (1973)

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01 - Rock Me Baby
02 - Can't You Feel It
03 - Cheap Tequilla
04 - All Tore Down
05 - Rock & Roll
06 - Silver Train
07 - Ain't Nothing To Me
08 - Still Alive & Well
09 - Too Much Seconal
10 - Let It Bleed
11 - Lucille
12 - From A Buick Six

Musicians:
    Johnny Winter - Guitar, Vocals
    Randy Jo Hobbs - bass
    Richard Hughes - drums
    Rick Derringer - guitar
    Jeremy Steig - flute
    Todd Rundgren - mellotron
    Mark Klingman – piano

 

Still Alive and Well proved to the record-buying public that Johnny Winter was both. This is a truly enjoyable album, chock-full of great tunes played well. Johnny's version of the Rolling Stones' "Silver Train" revealed the potential of this song and what the Stones failed to capture. Everything here is good, so get it and dig in. --- James Chrispell, allmusic.com

Johnny Winter's "comeback" album from 1973. Johnny is one of the most underrated guitar players that ever picked up a 6-string. While deeply rooted in the blues, Johnny delivers some rippin' stripped-down rock and roll on this album. Production is held to a very minimum of overdubs, and it's basically Johnny with his bass player and drummer. No effects, no slick production tricks, just good old rock and roll. He's one of those rare guys that can just plug the guitar into and amp and rip it up. In addition to his masterful playing, Johnny serves up some of his patented gritty, soulful vocals.

I have worn out two copies of this album, and one or two 8-track copies. This is the fourth time I have bought this, and it's just as fresh as it was in 1973. ---amazon.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Johnny Winter Sat, 12 Oct 2013 16:42:43 +0000
Johnny Winter – The Essential Johnny Winter (2013) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853-johnnywinter/14894-johnny-winter-the-essential-johnny-winter-2013.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853-johnnywinter/14894-johnny-winter-the-essential-johnny-winter-2013.html Johnny Winter – The Essential Johnny Winter (2013)

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CD1:
01 – Rock Me Baby
02 – Highway 61 Revisited
03 – One Step At A Time
04 – Leland Mississippi Blues
05 – Rock And Roll, Hoochie Koo
06 – TV Mama
07 – Good Morning Little School Girl (Live)
08 – Talk Is Cheap
09 – Roll With Me (Live Version)
10 – Rock And Roll People
11 – It’s My Own Fault (Live)
12 – Hustled Down In Texas
13 – Still Alive And Well
14 – Black Cat Bone (Live)
15 – Honest I Do
16 – Bon Ton Roulet
17 – Johnny B. Goode (Live)

CD2:
01 – Mama, Talk To Your Daughter (Live Woodstock Version)
02 – I’m Yours And I’m Hers
03 – Rollin’ ‘cross The Country
04 – Bony Moronie (Live)
05 – Dallas
06 – Miss Ann
07 – Self Destructive Blues
08 – Be Careful With A Fool
09 – Mean Town Blues (Live Woodstock Version)
10 – I’ll Drown In My Tears
11 – Tired Of Tryin’
12 – Harlem Shuffle (Live)
13 – Sweet Papa John
14 – Prodigal Son
15 – Jumpin’ Jack Flash (Live)
16 – Hurtin’ So Bad
17 – Rollin’ And Tumblin’ (Live)

 

This is an OK compilation. it includes most of the good stuff from his first Columbia album and the expected songs (Rock & Roll Hoochie Koo, Jumpin' Jack Flash and Highway 61). it is heavy on his '70s rock and roll work, and some Blue Sky material. However, none of the excellent Alligator recordings are here. That said, we all may quibble over what's here and what's left out (I would have liked to see Memory Pain from Second Winter, and more from the Johnny Winter And album). I was pleased to see his live rendition of "Harlem Shuffle' with brother Edgar (one of the best versions of the song recorded, beating the Stones version IMHO). Irregardless of the minor complaints, it is a good servicable overview of his most active period. If you REALLY are a fan, pick up "Progressive Blues Experiment" his first two Columbia CDs, the two Johnny Winter And CDs and the Alligator compilation (if its still out). He deserves a deluxe release of all his stuff in a mega box set. On a personal note: I first saw Johnny on his first tour with the former McCoys in Montreal. The mantra went through my head, "this is MORE than HEAVY". Forty two years later, that saying is still true. Rock on, Johnny!! ---Samuel B. King, amazon.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Johnny Winter Sun, 06 Oct 2013 15:58:27 +0000
Johnny Winter - Scorchin' Blues (1992) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853-johnnywinter/14128-johnny-winter-scorchin-blues-1992.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/blues/853-johnnywinter/14128-johnny-winter-scorchin-blues-1992.html Johnny Winter - Scorchin' Blues (1992)

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1. Walking By Myself 
2. Divin' Duck 
3. One Step At A Time 
4. Bladie Mae 
5. Mad Blues 
6. It Was Rainin' 
7. Mean Mistreater 
8. Mother-In-Law Blues 
9. Dallas 
10. Mean Town Blues (Live)

Johnny Winter (vocals, guitar, electric guitar, slide guitar, harp, bass guitar, drums); 
Randy Jo Hobbs (vocals); 
Jon Paris, Pat Rush (guitar); 
Bob Margolin (electric guitar); 
Pat Ramsey, James Cotton , Big Walter Horton (harp); 
Edgar Winter, Pinetop Perkins (piano);
Tommy Shannon, Charles Calmese (electric bass); 
Willie "Big Eyes" Smith, Bobby Torello (drums); 
Bobby Caldwell , "Uncle" John Turner (percussion).

 

Scorchin' Blues marries tracks from Johnny Winter's early Columbia albums -- including the classic National steel-driven "Dallas" from his 1969 debut -- with material from his return-to-roots Blue Sky period in the late '70s. The aggressive playing and raunchy vocals will appeal to both blues and rock fans, and Ben Sandmel crams an authoritative biography into seven pages, complete with interesting Winter quotes. The one downside: a miserly ten tracks spread over only 45 minutes of playing time. --- Roch Parisien, allmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Johnny Winter Sat, 18 May 2013 16:12:43 +0000