Music Notes The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29.html Tue, 24 Jan 2017 01:39:45 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Happy New Year 2017 http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/20901-happy-new-year-2017-.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/20901-happy-new-year-2017-.html Happy New Year 2017

 

 

May the year be brighter than the one gone by;

enveloped in goodness, well being, bliss and wealth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Pop and Misc. Notes Fri, 30 Dec 2016 23:32:42 +0000
Leonard Cohen’s Famous Blue Raincoat http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/20697-leonard-cohens-famous-blue-raincoat.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/20697-leonard-cohens-famous-blue-raincoat.html Leonard Cohen’s Famous Blue Raincoat

Sometime in the early 1970s, a thief stole Leonard Cohen's old raincoat from Marianne Ihlen's New York apartment. (Marianne Ihlen was a Norwegian woman who was the muse and girlfriend of Leonard Cohen.) God only know what happened to it, but the thief almost certainly had no idea he was stealing an object that belongs in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, if not the Smithsonian. It was that very coat that inspired Cohen to write one of his most beloved and mysterious songs. It's written in the form of a letter, possibly to the narrator's brother, who stole his lover, Jane.

Famous Blue Raincoat

The lyric tells the story of a love triangle between the speaker, a woman named Jane, and the male addressee, who is identified only briefly as "my brother, my killer." The exact nature of these relationships however, is far from clear.

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Famous Blue Raincoat

 

The song is deeply, almost embarrassingly, personal, an epistolary song about a wounded man who cannot help forgiving the friend. The overpowering emotion of the song inhibits another look at the lyrics, but Cohen’s autobiography immediately suggests problems with this common interpretation. Specifically, it is Cohen’s life that is being described both as the narrator and the other man. It is the friend in the song not “L. Cohen,” the narrator, who has a “famous blue raincoat.” But as the real Cohen noted in liner notes to the 1975 collection “The Best of Leonard Cohen,” the blue raincoat was his. “I had a good raincoat then, a Burberry I got in London in 1959….It hung more heroically when I took out the lining, and achieved glory when the frayed sleeves were repaired with a little leather.”

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Blue Raincoat

 

In a 1994 BBC Radio Interview Cohen remarked: “The trouble with is that I've forgotten the actual triangle. Whether it was my own . . . of course. I always felt that there was an invisible male seducing the woman I was with; now, whether this one was incarnate or merely imaginary I don't remember. I've always had the sense that either I've been that figure in relation to another couple or there'd been a figure like that in relation to my marriage. I don't quite remember (but I did have this feeling that there was always a third party, sometimes me, sometimes another man, sometimes another woman).”

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Leonard Cohen, 1970

 

"Famous Blue Raincoat" has captivated listeners ever since it first appeared on 1971's “Songs of Love and Hate”, though Cohen admits he's not happy with the lyrics. Ron Cornelius played guitar on this album and was Cohen's band leader for several years. Here's what he told Songfacts about this track: "We performed that song a lot of places. Typically gardens in Copenhagen, the Olympia Theater in Paris, the Vienna Opera House. We played that song a lot before it ever went to tape. We knew it was going to be big. We could see what the crowd did - you play the Royal Albert Hall, the crowd goes crazy, and you're really saying something there. If I had to pick a favorite from the album, it would probably be 'Famous Blue Raincoat.’ "

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“Songs of Love and Hate”, album

 

The song is written in the key of a-minor. The time signature is 3/4, which is slightly uncommon in the rock and pop genre, but is used by Cohen in several other songs as well, like “Chelsea Hotel #2” or “Take This Waltz.” The tempo is fairly slow and the musical arrangement is very sparse. Cohen’s guitar is predominant and carries the song; additionally there are female background voices in the stanzas and the third bridge, and in some spots there is also a string section. The lyric itself is not written in a strict meter, but, especially during the stanzas, the speech rhythm is essentially dactylic, which fits well with a 3/4 time signature.

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Bob Johnson, Leonard Cohen, Ron Cornelius at Royal Albert Hall

 

"It was a song I've never been satisfied with," Cohen said in 1994. "It's not that I've resisted an impressionistic approach to songwriting, but I've never felt that this one, that I really nailed the lyric. I'm ready to concede something to the mystery, but secretly I've always felt that there was something about the song that was unclear."

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Leonard Cohen, 1971

 

Famous Blue Raincoat lyrics


It's four in the morning, the end of December
I'm writing you now just to see if you're better
New York is cold, but I like where I'm living
There's music on Clinton street all through the evening
I hear that you're building your little house deep in the desert
You're living for nothing now
I hope you're keeping some kind of record

Yes, and Jane came by with a lock of your hair
She said that you gave it to her
That night that you planned to go clear
Did you ever go clear?

On the last time we saw you, you looked so much older
Your famous blue raincoat was torn at the shoulder
You'd been to the station to meet every train
You came home without Lili Marlene
You treated my woman to a flake of your life
And when she came back she was nobody's wife
Well; I see you there with a rose in your teeth
One more thin gypsy thief
Well I see Jane's awake
She sends her regards

And what can I tell you, my brother, my killer
What can I possibly say
I guess that I miss you, I guess I forgive you
I'm glad you stood in my way
If you ever come by here, for Jane or for me
Well, your enemy is sleeping and his woman is free

Yes, and thanks for the trouble you took from her eyes
I thought it was there for good so I never tried
And Jane came by with a lock of your hair
She said that you gave it to her
That night that you planned to go clear

Sincerely,
L. Cohen

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Famous Blue Raincoat

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Pop and Misc. Notes Sun, 20 Nov 2016 11:03:35 +0000
The Blower's Daughter by Damien Rice http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/20266-the-blowers-daughter-by-damien-rice.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/20266-the-blowers-daughter-by-damien-rice.html The Blower's Daughter by Damien Rice

Rice first gained notice in America when “The Blower’s Daughter,” a single from his debut album “O” in 2002, played a pivotal role in the Mike Nichols film “Closer” in 2004. The movie follows two captivating women and two intriguing men as they sort out their very complicated relationships. The song is used twice in the movie to express the pain and confusion of love. (The music video is included on the Closer DVD.) This was Damien Rice's first single. It was first issued in Ireland in 2001 on his own label: Damien Rice Music.

The Blower's Daughter

What is a "blower"? It can mean a lot of things depending on the context but in this case, it is a telephone. In the UK, the precursor to the telephone was the speaking tube, which was a tube stoppered with whistles at both ends. To call the person on the other end, you would remove the stopper and blow into the tube, which would whistle for your party. When the telephone was invented, many in Britain continued referring to it as a "blower."

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"Closer", DVD

 

Growing up in Kildare County, Ireland, Damien Rose found himself working at a call center in the late '90s. On one of Rice's calls, a woman answered the phone and began such a dialogue. As Rice told the story when he would introduce the song at concerts, he enjoyed speaking to this lady and became smitten. For months, Rice "followed the lead" by calling her during his shifts, where they would continue their increasingly intimate chats. Then one day she stopped answering. The woman was just a girl, maybe 16 years old. Crestfallen, Rice realized that when he had called, she was on summer vacation, and she stopped answering when it was time to return to school. She had been using him for entertainment, and Rice was devastated. "The Blower's Daughter" was the song he wrote about the incident.

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Damien Rice

 

Damien, the young man from Celbridge has been working on the album “O” for almost two years, and its release was greeted with enthusiasm and relief from a growing fan base who must have wondered if they were ever going to hear it. Damien Rice's debut full-length, “O”, is nothing less than a work of genius, a perfect cross between Ryan Adams and David Gray and a true contender for one of the best albums of 2003. This Irish singer/songwriter works with impassioned folk songs that move from stripped-down to grandly orchestrated in a heartbeat.

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The Blower's Daughter, single, 2001

 

The production is reminiscent of “Songs of Leonard Cohen” -- simple guitars, vocals, and then those swelling strings, all of which sound like they were recorded right in the same room. The cello, provided by Vyvienne Long, is just one example of Damien's attempts to break away from a conventional instrumental formula of guitar, bass and drums. Rice’s plaintive vocal, embroidered by the mournful solo cello, is suddenly brightened by an instrumental flourish and Lisa Hannigan's vocals--before just as quickly wafting on the breeze.

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Damien Rice - "O", album, 2003

 

Hannigan is obviously Rice’s secret weapon—for all of his considerable talent, Hannigan’s presence really fleshes his ideas out. She rarely, if ever sings simple background vocals, instead offering countermelodies or completely different points of view. In “The Blower’s Daughter”, Rice laments a romantic’s apology: ‘Can’t take my eyes off of you’. Simple enough, but the song really gains depth when Hannigan responds in almost ghostly fashion, ‘Did I say that I want you to?’

 

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Lisa Hannigan

 

Rice isn’t afraid to follow his muse, regardless of whether she inspires him to create artsy cacophonies or gentle lullabies. Sometimes, it gets the better of him (despite the fact that “O” methodically builds up to “Eskimo”‘s ultra-dramatic crescendo, it still feels a little cheesy), but there’s no way you can penalize him for the effort. With “O,” Rice has brought something new to the singer/songwriter genre: an accomplished sense of dramatics that keeps his music from ever becoming earthbound.

 

 

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Lisa Hannigan & Damien Rice

 

The Blower's Daughter, lyrics

 


And so it is just like you said it would be
Life goes easy on me
most of the time
And so it is the shorter story
No love, no glory
No hero in her sky

I can't take my eyes off of you
I can't take my eyes off you
I can't take my eyes off of you
I can't take my eyes off you
I can't take my eyes off you
I can't take my eyes

And so it is just like you said it should be
We'll both forget the breeze
Most of the time
And so it is the colder water
The Blower's Daughter
The pupil in denial

I can't take my eyes off of you
I can't take my eyes off you
I can't take my eyes off of you
I can't take my eyes off you
I can't take my eyes off you
I can't take my eyes

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Blower's Daughter

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Pop and Misc. Notes Mon, 29 Aug 2016 12:48:05 +0000
Katyusha http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/19980-katyusha.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/19980-katyusha.html Katyusha

One of the most famous melodies from the musical propaganda of the Soviet Union is undoubtedly the song “Katyusha.” Many people - including Russians - think this song is from the old Russian folklore, but nothing is farther from the truth. The tune was written in 1938 as part of the propaganda machine of the Soviet Union which, in that time, was running at full capacity. The word Katyusha is a tender nickname derived from the Russian name Ekaterina (Catherine). The name is fondly thought of by Russians for two main reasons, both emerging from the darkest days of the 20th century.

Katyusha

In 1938, as the light of peace was being extinguished across Europe once again, two Russians, composer Matvey Blanter and his poet friend Mikhail Isakovsky, wrote the score and words for a song. Katyusha tells the story of a peasant girl who longs for her beloved, who is serving far away on the border. The song evokes three themes central to the Russian psyche: the loyal girl pining for her love, the heroic soldier and the Motherland. The tune is upbeat and rousing, but the themes of love, national pride and the impending sense of war are all present. Little perhaps did the song’s creators know how Katyusha’s prophetic elements would be played out, just three years later.

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Matvey Blanter

 

In 1936, the Committee for Artistic Affairs made the decision to establish the State Jazz Orchestra of the USSR. Conductor Viktor Nikolaevich Knushevitsky (1906-1972) was assigned to the function of musical director. The goal was to canalize the so-called mass song in the direction desired by the regime. On November 27, 1938, the Orchestra had its first performance. It was in the Colonnade of the House of Unions, parodied by Bulgakov in Chapter 5 of “The Master and Margarita” as the Coliseum. And immediately the band made its social mission true. For the occasion, Blanter had written the song “Katyusha” on a text by the poet Isakovsky. It was sung by Valentina Batishcheva that evening, and it was an instant success.

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Mikhail Isakovsky

 

In July 1941, the Soviet Union had already become a state full of hapless Katyushas as German armies killed or captured millions of Russian and Ukrainian soldiers. It was then, at this critical moment that female students from an industrial school in Moscow sang the song to the men marching past them to the front. The song deeply touched the soldiers and became popular throughout the USSR and Poland, a call to fight off the German Nazis.

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Valentina Batishcheva

 

When the Second World War started, the song was still very popular. So popular that the soldiers of the Red Army soon would give the nickname Katyusha to their multi-rocket launchers BM-13, BM-8 and BM-31. The letter K on their side, from the Voronezh Komintern factory where they were built, led to the adoption of the fond name “Katyusha”. According to a legend, soldiers were singing the song “Katyusha” during the shooting. The German soldiers however called them Stalin's Organs, because of their physical resemblance the pipes of an church organ.

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Katyusha, multi-rocket launcher

 

In 1943, Felice Cascione (1918-1944) wrote an Italian text entitled "Fischia il vento" to the melody of Katyusha. In that version, the tune would become one of the most popular songs of the Italian partisans in World War II, along with “Bella Ciao.”

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Fischia il vento (italian version of Katyusha)

 

Perhaps you know the melody of Katyusha better as the Casatchok. That tune became extremely popular in Western Europe in 1968. In France, for example, the instrumental version of Dimitri Dourakine was at the number 1 position on the national charts for three months in the beginning of 1969. Dimitri Dourakine is not a Russian, as you may think, he's a dealer in musical instruments from Leuven, Belgium. He had no idea of the origin of the song. He had taken the melody from the Bulgarian singer Boris Rubaschkin, who had departed far from the original text of Katyusha in 1967 when he released in under the title Ras dwa Casatschok.

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Dimitri Dourakine - Casatschok

 

Rubaschkin had turned the song into some kind of Bavarian drinking song in which Katyusha was replaced by Petrushka, and the theme of the war was changed into the ambiance of vodka and balalaikas.

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Boris Rubaschkin - Casatschok

 

Still today, “Katyusha” is always performed on any celebration of Victory Day in Russia, every year on May 9. In the '90s, after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the mass celebrations were reduced, but it changed again when Vladimir Putin came into power. Since then, Victory Day is again a day of massive celebrations with a great sense of national self-esteem, on which the popular culture plays a major role. The 60th anniversary in 2005 was the largest ever mass celebration in Russia, including this version of “Katyusha” by singer Irina Bilyk.

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Katyusha

 

Катюша (Katuysha, Russian lyrics)


Расцветали яблони и груши, 
Поплыли туманы над рекой; 
Выходила на берег Катюша, 
На высокий берег, на крутой. 

Выходила, песню заводила 
Про степного, сизого орла, 
Про того, которого любила, 
Про того, чьи письма берегла. 

Ой, ты песня, песенка девичья, 
Ты лети за ясным солнцем вслед, 
И бойцу на дальнем пограничье 
От Катюши передай привет. 

Пусть он вспомнит девушку простую, 
Пусть услышить, как она поет, 
Пусть он землю бережет родную, 
А любовь Катюша сбережет. 

Расщветали яблони и груши, 
Поплыли туманы над рекой; 
Выходила на берег Катюша, 
На высокий берег, на крутой

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Katyusha

 

Katyusha, English translation by Katya (russmus.net)


Apples and pears were blossoming 
Mist on the river floating 
On the bank Katyusha stepped out 
On the high steep bank 

Stepped out, started a song 
About one grey steppe eagle 
About her loved one 
Whose letters she cherished 

Oh song, maiden's song 
Fly towards the clear sun 
And to the warrior on a far away border 
Bring Katyusha's greeting 

May he remember this simple maiden 
And hear her singing 
May he save our motherland 
And love, Katyusha will save

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Katyusha

 

Katyusha, French translation by Katya (russmus.net)


Pommiers et poiriers fleurissaient
Le brouillard enveloppait la rivière
Katyusha descendait sur la berge
Sur la berge haute et abrupte

Elle descendait, entonnant sa chanson
La chanson de l'aigle gris des steppes
De celui qu'elle aimait tant
Dont elle chérissait les lettres

Oh chanson, chansonnette de jeune fille
Envole-toi vers le soleil ardent
Et apporte au guerrier sur la frontière lointaine
Les salutations de Katyusha

Puisse-t-il se souvenir d'une simple jeune fille
Puisse-t-il entendre comment elle chante
Puisse-t-il protéger la terre natale
Et son amour, Katyusha le protégera

Pommiers et poiriers fleurissaient
Le brouillard descendait sur la rivière
Katyusha descendait sur la berge
Sur la berge haute et abrupt
 

Irina Bilik - Katyusha (Victory Day 2005)

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Pop and Misc. Notes Mon, 04 Jul 2016 22:17:17 +0000
Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow? http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/19070-will-you-still-love-me-tomorrow.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/19070-will-you-still-love-me-tomorrow.html Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?

In 1960, Carol King was the music-writing half of a budding songwriting team which also included her lyric-writing husband Gerry Goffin. When they got the opportunity to write a song for up-and-coming girl group The Shirelles, they responded with “Will You Love Me Tomorrow,” a pop masterpiece that topped the charts in 1961, the first #1 in history by a girl group and the first major success for the Goffin/King duo. Goffin and King started out as Brill Building-scene writers, working for impresario Don Kirshner at his Aldon company. As the story goes, Kirshner recognized the song's potential immediately, handing over a 10,000 dollar advance to each of the writers upon being presented with the demo. This was huge money to the struggling couple, who until then had none of their songs recorded.

Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow?

Amazingly, Carole King was only 18 when she wrote the song. She recorded a version herself later, sounding like a hesitant older woman, which simply doesn't work. It joins the long list of songs whose cover versions were better than the composer's own. The Shirelles had several other hits, including Mama Said, Soldier Boy, Baby It's You, and Dedicated to the One I Love. But nothing conveyed the same sad, plangent raw emotion as Will You Love Me …

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Carol King & Gerry Goffin (1959)

 

The Shirelles grew up in Passaic, New Jersey. Inspired by other girl groups, such as the Chantels (“Maybe) and the Bobettes (“Mr. Lee”), they started to write songs and sing together while still in high school. In 1958, the Shirelles recorded their ode to a week-long romance, called “I Met Him on a Sunday,” and made the pop charts at #49. The next release, written by lead singer Shirley Owens and called “Tonight’s the Night,” reached #39. “Will You Love Me Tomorrow” followed, and it rose straight to the top of the charts and remained at #1 for two weeks.

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The Shireless

 

It is impossible to imagine a better anthem to kick off what became known as “the girl group” sound. The title poses a universal question endemic to all women, particularly to teenagers. The pre-coital time frame of the lyric is, to say the least, provocative. The song accurately portrays that maddeningly exciting, but frighteningly poignant moment. As such, “Will You Love Me Tomorrow” was the salvo shot that signaled the arrival of a feminine perspective in rock-and-roll music.

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The Shireless - Will You Love Me Tomorrow

 

Goffin’s lyrics deftly touch on the doubt that lurks behind all new romances. As sung by Shirelles’ leader Shirley Owens in unflappable manner, the song doesn’t skimp on the wonder inherent in any fresh coupling. But it’s also unflinchingly realistic about the possibility that the fairy dust will dissolve at dawn.

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Gerry Goffin

 

“Can I believe the magic in your sighs?” Owens pointedly asks her paramour. In the bridge, Goffin’s words flow like champagne even as they fear the possible hangover: “Tonight with words unspoken/You’ll say that I’m the only one/But will my heart be broken/When the night meets the morning sun.” King’s melody plays a big role in the overall effect, arching high in the verses and middle eight while accompanied by strings that elegantly trip across the proceedings like moonlight dancers, before coming back down to Earth for the interrogative refrain.

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Don Kirshner

 

Born in 1942 in Brooklyn, Carol King grew up listening to the first wave of rock ‘n’ roll to hit mass audiences in America. Her earliest songs reflected a pop-rock sensibility geared to a white teen market. At Queens College in Brooklyn, where she trained to be a teacher, she met Gerry Goffin, with whom she would form one of the most successful songwriting teams of the ’60s (classmates included Paul Simon and Neil Diamond). A trained chemist, Goffin wrote lyrics to accompany King’s deceptively complex arrangements.

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Carol King

 

Before “Will You Love Me Tomorrow,” Goffin and King wrote more than four dozen songs that were never recorded. They lived in a basement apartment in New York City, and when King finished her secretarial day job and Goffin finished his chemist job, they’d sit in a tiny office belonging to Don Kirshner at Aldon Music and toil over songs.

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Brill Building, NYC

 

Goffin and King came from an era when performers rarely wrote their own material but relied heavily on songwriters to provide them with hit singles. The most famous factory for this songwriting talent in the ’50s and ’60s was New York’s Brill Building. In Rolling Stone, Jon Landau wrote: “The songs of Goffin and King are superb examples of the songwriting craft of the ’60s. Finely honed to meet the demands of the clients who commissioned them, and written with the requirements of AM radio always firmly in mind, they still managed to express themselves in a rich way. Like Hollywood directors who learned how to make the limitations of the system work for them and in the process created something of their own pop vision.”

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Carol King

 

King released her first solo album in 1970. “Writer” was an example of King’s growing musical maturity. With dense, layered piano chords, the songs were far removed from her teen pop ditties of the ’60s. King’s best work was not with a group of musicians, but when she was simply accompanying herself on piano. “I knew that her demos were more popular than her first two records,” legendary producer Lou Adler told Rolling Stone.

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Carol King

 

“Tapestry,” released in February 1971, spent 15 weeks in the No. 1 spot on Billboard’s chart and stayed in the top 100 for six years. By the end of 1971, “Tapestry” was still selling 150,000 copies per week and had scored four top 10 hits; while a complete accounting of its sales has never been made, it remains one of the biggest-selling albums of all time.

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Carol King

 

Still, Carole King is one of rock’s most valuable icons, a successful woman performer who both rejected the idea of feminism and embodied it. She and Gerry Goffin were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990. Throughout her career, King has eluded the press, offering only rare tours or concerts and even rarer interviews and appearances. “She’s a songwriter and a recording artist,” Lou Adler told Rolling Stone after the release of “Carole King Music.” “That doesn’t necessarily have to make her a personality. It’s useless to have to explain your lifestyle in order to explain your music.”

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In the 2013 Broadway “Beautiful: The Carole King Musical,” the Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow? is featured in part four times: once during its writing, once during King recording a demo of it, then with the Shirelles performing it, and then King singing and playing it later during an especially bad time in her marriage with Goffin. No other song is featured as frequently in the musical.

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The Shireless

 

The Shirelles - Will You Love Me Tomorrow, lyrics


Tonight, you're mine, completely,
so give me your love, so sweetly.
Tonight, the life of love is in your eyes,
but will you love me tomorrow?

Is this a last thing treasure,
or just a moments pleasure.
Tonight beneath the magic of your sighs,
will you still love me tomorrow?

Tonight with words unspoken.
You said, that I'm the only one.
But will my heart be broken,
when the night,
meets the morning sun?

I´d like to know,
that your love,
is love, I can't be sure of.
So tell me now, and I won't ask again.
will you still love me tomorrow?

So tell me now, and I won't ask again,
will you still love me tomorrow?
Will you still love me tomorrow?
Will you still love me tomorrow?

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Will you still love me tomorrow?

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Pop and Misc. Notes Wed, 13 Jan 2016 19:46:06 +0000
Baby Can I Hold You (Tracy Chapman) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/18075-baby-can-i-hold-you-tracy-chapman.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/18075-baby-can-i-hold-you-tracy-chapman.html Baby Can I Hold You (Tracy Chapman)

Tracy Chapman Quotes:

“Songwriting is a very mysterious process. It feels like creating something from nothing. It's something I don't feel like I really control.”

“We have more media than ever and more technology in our lives. It's supposed to help us communicate, but it has the opposite effect of isolating us.”

“With other people, you're always swapping music. Somebody is always listening to something you've never heard. It's a great way to hear all sorts of new things.”

 

Baby Can I Hold You

Tracy Chapman was born March 30, 1964 in Cleveland, Ohio. Raised in a working class neighborhood Chapman learned how to play guitar as a child, and began to write her own songs shortly afterward. Following high school, she won a minority placement scholarship and decided to attend Tufts University, where she studied anthropology and African studies. While at Tufts, she became fascinated with folk-rock and singer/songwriters, and began performing her own songs at coffeehouses.

 

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Tracy Chapman

 

Before graduation, she caught the attention of Elektra Records, which hired music industry veteran David Kershenbaum to produce her first record. “People really wanted what she had, and they weren’t getting it,” said Kershenbaum, who previously had worked with Joe Jackson, Joan Baez, and Cat Stevens, among other artists. “She got there at the right moment with stuff that was good.”

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David Kershenbaum & Tracy Chapman

 

It was during the height of the era of fast-buck capitalism, at a 1988 televised concert celebrating Nelson Mandela's 70th birthday, that Tracy Chapman came out of nowhere and enthralled the world with her songs about social injustice. Just her, an acoustic guitar and a hushed Wembley Stadium.

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Tracy Chapman at Wembley Stadium

 

So meeting the protest singer in the exclusive surroundings of a five-star west London hotel suite feels more than a little incongruous. She shuffles into the room, coddling her stinking cold with a chunky red scarf, and blinks out at the magnificent view of Hyde Park. She looks reassuringly unchanged - all long dreadlocks and slouchy clothes. There is still a mighty roll to her cheekbones, and the lurgy has done nothing to cloud her gentle, wise eyes.

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Baby Can I Hold You

 

Back in 1988, Tracy Chapman's eponymous debut album became one of the key records of the Bush era, providing a touchstone for the entire PC movement while reviving the singer/songwriter tradition. Her first album, which included the singles “Talkin' 'bout a Revolution”, “Fast Car” and “Baby Can I Hold You,” went on to be a No 1 hit on both sides of the Atlantic.

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Tracy Chapman - Tracy Chapman, album

 

And Tracy Chapman is firmly within the classic singer/songwriter tradition, sounding for all the world as if it was recorded in the early '70s -- that is, if all you paid attention to were the sonics, since Chapman's songs are clearly a result of the Reagan revolution. Even the love songs and laments are underscored by a realized vision of trickle-down modern life -- listen to the lyrical details of "Fast Car" for proof. Chapman's impassioned liberal activism and emotional resonance enlivens her music, breathing life into her songs even when the production is a little bit too clean.

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Tracy Chapman

 

Album sales shot through the roof following this one appearance and she went on to sell over 10 million copies and win three Grammy awards. Tracks like ‘Fast Car’ and ‘Baby Can I Hold You’ became instant radio favourites.

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Tracy Chapman - Baby Can I Hold You

 

"Baby Can I Hold You" reached the top fifty in the United States, unlike its predecessor, "Talkin' 'bout a Revolution", but it failed to become Chapman's second top forty hit, peaking at #48. It did, however, give her a second chart entry on the US Adult Contemporary charts, peaking at #19 in early 1989.

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Tracy Chapman

 

Neil Diamond recorded the song for his 1989 album, “The Best Years of Our Lives” and became the first of many artists to cover the song. In 1997, the Irish boy band Boyzone released a cover of "Baby Can I Hold You". The single, like "Picture of You" before it, peaked at #2 on the official UK singles chart and stayed in the top 75 for fourteen weeks. The song was the 26th best selling single of 1997 in the United Kingdom.

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Neil Diamond - Baby Can I Hold You

 

In 2005, Boyzone frontman Ronan Keating released his own cover of "Baby Can I Hold You" as the third and final single from his greatest hits compilation, 10 Years of Hits. It became the second song that he originally recorded with Boyzone to be re-released for his own solo career. In the United Kingdom, the single was only released via digital download and thus it failed to chart. In Germany, the single received a full-scale release and peaked at #42 on the German Singles Chart.

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Ronan Keating - Baby Can I Hold You

 

Chapman subsequently re-recorded the song as a duet with Luciano Pavarotti for the CD “Pavarotti and Friends for Cambodia and Tibet.” And it was re-released as a single in promotion of the hits package Collection which reached #3 in the United Kingdom in 2001.

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Luciano Pavarotti & Tracy Chapman

 

Baby Can I Hold You lyrics


Sorry
Is all that you can't say
Years gone by and still
Words don't come easily
Like sorry like sorry

Forgive me
Is all that you can't say
Years gone by and still
Words don't come easily
Like forgive me forgive me

But you can say baby
Baby can I hold you tonight
Maybe if I told you the right words
At the right time you'd be mine

I love you
Is all that you can say
Years gone by and still
Words don't come easily
Like I love you I love you

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Baby Can I Hold You

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Pop and Misc. Notes Sat, 11 Jul 2015 20:59:18 +0000
Moscow Nights (Podmoskovnye Vechera) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/17964-moscow-nights-podmoskovnye-vechera.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/17964-moscow-nights-podmoskovnye-vechera.html Moscow Nights (Podmoskovnye Vechera)

There is an interesting story how Zhenya Kanaeva decided to choose ”Moscow Nights” for her Ribbon 2008. Before the season 2008 Irina Viner – head coach of Russian National Gymnast Team – went to China and visited one restaurant. At the door of the restaurant there was a bell singing the melody of Moscow Nights. And she says that every time when somebody entered the restaurant, all the visitors would start to smile and sing the song together with the melody. So this way she understood that Moscow Nights is a right song for the Olympic Program for China. On her return to Novogorsk she said: ”Zhenya, I know which music we shall choose for your ribbon!”

Moscow Nights (Podmoskovnye Vechera)

In 1955 two experienced Russian creators, Vasily Solovyov-Sedoi (composer) and Mikhail Matusovsky (lyrics) wrote a song called "Leningrad Nights." But a powerful force requested a change. The Soviet Ministry of Culture thought something about evenings in Moscow might be more appropriate, and so the lyrics and title were changed.

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Zhenya Kanaeva with ribbon

 

Vasily Pavlovich Solovyov-Sedoi (1907 – 1979) was a Russian classical composer from Saint Petersburg (Leningrad). Originally named Solovyov, when he entered the Russian "Composer's Union" he added the suffix "Sedoi", meaning grey-haired, to avoid confusion with another composer with the same surname. Besides “Podmoskovnye Vechera“ (“Moscow Nights”) he composed other famous song “Solovi “ (“Nightingales”).

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Vasily Solovyov-Sedoi

 

Mikhail Lvovich Matusovsky (1915 - 1990) was Soviet poet, a winner of the USSR State Prize (1977). He is famous for his lyric poems many of which became lyrics of the popular songs: "School Walz", "In the Damp Earth-Huts", "The Sacred Stone", "The Windows of Moscow", "Don't Forget" and "Moscow Nights".

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Mikhail Matusovsky

 

Vladimir Troshin was the singer and actor who first recorded "Moscow Nights," (1956) giving the song its initial burst of fame.

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Vladimir Troshin - Moscow Nights, single

 

The song became very popular in 1957 after the International Youth Festival which was held in Moscow. That time the song became an anthem of the festival and touched the hearts not only of Soviet people, but also the hearts of many foreigners.

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Dmitri Hvorostovsky - Moscow Nights

 

In 1961 the British jazz group, Kenny Ball and his Jazzmen, recorded an instrumental version called "Midnight in Moscow." They even played it when on tour in Moscow. It did extremely well on the charts of the Western world. This version peaked at number two on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart in early 1962; in March that year, and it spent three weeks at number one on the American Easy Listening chart.

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Kenny Ball and his Jazzmen - Midnight in Moscow

 

The Russian pop singer Vitas recorded a version of the song with his counter-tenor voice. He performed it at several Chinese festivals before its release on Masterpieces of Three Centuries, released on November 25, 2010.

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Vitas - Masterpieces of Three Centuries, album

 

“Moscow Nights” is a Russian song, one of those best known outside its homeland. This song made an entry into the “Guinness Book of World Records” as the song most frequently sang in the world.

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Moscow Nights (Podmoskovnye Vechera)

 

Moscow Suburban Nights, lyrics


No rustling’s heard in the garden deep,
Till the dawn everything’s so quiet,
If you only knew how dear to me,
All these Moscow Suburban Nights.

Waters flowing or not flowing,
Made of lunar silver, the river runs,
There is sound of song, or there is no sound,
In the quiet nights all are at once.

Why, o darling mine, shy and quick is your glance?
Bowing low your head, you look apart?
So hard for me not tell at once,
Or to express everything in my heart.

And the morning yet is getting close an’ now,
And, my darling, please, be so kind,
Ever not forget all these summer nights,
Those suburban Moscow Nights.

No rustling’s heard in the garden deep,
Till the dawn everything’s so quiet,
If you only knew how dear to me,
All these Moscow suburban Nights.

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Zolotoe Kol'co - Podmoskovnye Vechera, single

 

Podmoskovniye vechera (Подмосковные вечера)

Original Transliteration


Не слышны в саду даже шорохи,
Всё здесь замерло до утра.
Eсли б знали вы, как мне дороги
Подмосковные вечера.

Речка движется и не движется,
Вся из лунного серебра.
Песня слышится и не слышится
В эти тихие вечера.
.
Что ж ты, милая, смотришь искоса,
Низко голову наклоня?
Трудно высказать и не высказать
Всё, что на сердце у меня.
.
А рассвет уже всё заметнее.
Так, пожалуйста, будь добра.
Не забудь и ты эти летние
Подмосковные вечера.

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Moscow Nights

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Pop and Misc. Notes Sun, 21 Jun 2015 15:00:13 +0000
Stand By Me Mr. Ben E. King http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/17712-stand-by-me-mr-ben-e-king.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/17712-stand-by-me-mr-ben-e-king.html Stand By Me Mr. Ben E. King

According to the documentary History of Rock 'n' Roll, Ben E. King wrote "Stand By Me" when he was still the lead singer of The Drifters — but the group didn't want it. As King recalled, the Drifters' manager Mike Stoller told him, "Not a bad song, but we don't need it." But after King went solo, Stoller revived "Stand By Me" at the end of a session with Leiber. "I showed him the song," King said. " Did it on piano a little bit, he (Stoller) called the musicians back into the studio, and we went ahead and recorded it."

Stand By Me

Stoller recalls it differently: “ I remember arriving at our office as Jerry(Jerry Leiber, producer) and Ben were working on lyrics for a new song. King had the beginnings of a melody that he was singing a cappella. I went to the piano and worked up the harmonies, developing a bass pattern that became the signature of the song. Ben and Jerry quickly finished the lyrics.”


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Ben E. King

 

"Stand By Me" was the name of a gospel hymn written by the Philadelphia minister Charles Albert Tindley in 1905. His hymn became popular in churches throughout the American south and was recorded by various Gospel acts in the 1950s.

 

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Charles Albert Tindley

 

In an interview with the TV station WGBH, Jerry Leiber explained: "Ben E. is not a songwriter, he's a singer, he might have written two songs in his whole career. I would guess that this comes out of church. The whole 'stand by me' and the way the release takes out, it sounds like a gospel-type song."


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Jerry Keiber and Mike Stoller

 

Ben E. King was born Benjamin Earl Nelson in Henderson, North Carolina, and moved to New York with his family at the age of nine, part of the migration of black workers from the southern states to the more prosperous cities of the industrialized north. His unusual vocal flexibility, spanning the range from bass to tenor, enabled him to sing virtually all the lead and harmony parts.

 

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The Five Crowns

 

At 20, he joined a doo-wop group called The Five Crowns, who became The Drifters after that group's manager fired the band's previous members. He co-wrote and sang on the band's single “There Goes My Baby,” which reached number two in the US in 1959.

 

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The Drifters (1959)

 

When management refused to raise the musicians’ $100-a-week salary, King quit and went solo. He changed his surname and went on to have hits like “Spanish Harlem”, “Don’t Play That Song (You Lied)”, and of course “Stand By Me”.

 

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Ben E. King - Spanish Harlem

 

King continued to record throughout the 60s, but the uneven quality of albums such as “Ben E King Sings for Soulful Lovers” and “Seven Letters” indicate that he, or his producers, was unsure of his direction.

 

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Ben E. King - Stand By Me (1961)

 

Further success proved elusive, however, until 1975, when Ertegün encountered him singing in a Miami nightspot and invited him to return to Atlantic. The slinky “Supernatural Thing,” the first record under the new deal, became part of the overture to the disco boom, its success allowing him to emerge from the world of supper clubs and oldies shows.

 

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Ben E. King

 

Later in the decade he collaborated with the Average White Band, and subsequent recordings found him diversifying into jazz alongside Milt Jackson, the vibraphonist of the Modern Jazz Quartet, and David “Fathead” Newman, Ray Charles’s longtime tenor saxophone soloist, with a 2003 album recorded live at the Blue Note club in New York. His last album, “Heart & Soul,” was released in 2010.

 

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Ben E. King

 

King was arguably too urbane and mature a performer, despite his southern roots, to upstage his more unbuttoned rivals at a time when soul music was at its peak. He could nevertheless claim to possess one of the era’s most distinguished voices, his warm tone and polished phrasing indelible associated with definitive performances of a handful of songs that were written with short-term success in mind but whose appeal now seems ageless.

 

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Ben E. King

 

With Stand By Me Ben E. King had his first R&B No 1, and went to No 4 on the pop charts, and a 1986 re-release coinciding with its use as the theme song for the movie of the same name following its appearance in the film, when it peaked at No. 9, and also in an advertisement for Levi Jeans. It also reached No. 1 on the UK Singles Chart in 1987 after its re-release, mostly because of the jeans spot, originally reaching No. 27 on its first release.

 

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Ben E. King - Stand By Me (1987)

 

Many suggest that John Lennon recorded one of the best cover versions of Stand By Me. He recorded it for his 1975 album "Rock 'n' Roll."

 

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John Lennon - Stand By Me (1987)

 

During an interview with Spinner UK, King was asked if he had any favorite cover versions of this song. He replied: "David Ruffin from the Temptations did a great version of it. And, of course, the one that held up in my head the most was John Lennon's version. He took it and made it as if it should have been his song as opposed to mine. Now there's a [Dominican] singer named Prince [Royce] - he has a version out there that I think is brilliant. And then there's Sean Kingston, with 'Beautiful Girls' [chuckles] - that's another one that did well. So many of them have done well. As a songwriter, it pleases me a lot - you don't always have a chance to write a song that people can relate to."


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Cassius Clay (Muhammad Ali) - Stand By Me

 

"Stand by Me" was ranked 122nd on Rolling Stone's list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. In 1999, BMI named it as the fourth most-performed song of the 20th century, with about seven million performances.

Ben E. King (Benjamin Earl Nelson), singer and songwriter, born 28 September 1938; died 30 April 2015.

 

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Ben E. King

 

Stand by Me, lyrics


When the night has come
And the land is dark
And the moon is the only light we'll see
No, I won't be afraid
No, I won't be afraid
Just as long as you stand
Stand by me

So darling, darling
Stand by me
Oh, stand by me
Oh, stand
Stand by me
Stand by me

If the sky that we look upon
Should tumble and fall
Or the mountains should crumble to the sea
I won't cry, I won't cry
No, I won't shed a tear
Just as long as you stand
Stand by me

Darling, darling
Stand by me
Oh, stand by me
Oh, stand now
Stand by me
Stand by me (x2)

Whenever you're in trouble won't you
Stand by me,
Oh, stand by me

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The Drifters (1961)

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Pop and Misc. Notes Sun, 03 May 2015 19:50:52 +0000
Mbube - Wimoweh - The Lion Sleeps Tonight http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/17212-mbube-wimoweh-the-lion-sleeps-tonight.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/17212-mbube-wimoweh-the-lion-sleeps-tonight.html Mbube - Wimoweh - The Lion Sleeps Tonight

Mbube is a South African vocal genre, traditionally performed A cappella in a powerful and loud way. Mbube appeared in Johannesburg in the 1920s. The word mbube means "lion" in Zulu. The members of the group are male although a few groups have a female singer. In this form, groups of voices singing in unison are employed to create intricate harmonies and textures. It was pioneered by Solomon Linda and was popularized by Miriam as well as the band Ladysmith Black Mambazo in the 1960s.

Mbube or The Lion Sleeps Tonight

For the last 50 years, that happy little word has been a universally recognized shorthand for the song known as “The Lion Sleeps Tonight.” From Pete Seeger’s version in 1952 (titled “Wimoweh”) to the Tokens’ No. 1 single in 1961 to its featured role in the hugely popular Disney film and Broadway musical 'The Lion King,' the song has enchanted generations, sold millions of copies and passed into the world’s musical vernacular as a modern folk tune.

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Mbube

 

But the history of “The Lion Sleeps Tonight” is anything but happy. "Mbube" was written in the 1920s by Solomon Linda, a South African singer of Zulu origin.

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Solomon Linda - Mbube, 1939 single

 

Solomon Linda (1909 – 1962) grows up near Ladysmith, Zululand, singing Zulu songs with his friends. Joining other Zulu migrants, Linda and his friends move to Johannesburg to find work. They form a local music group called the Evening Birds, and are credited with popularizing the musical form of isicathamiya, which combines call-and-response vocal music with a choral sound.

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Solomon Linda

 

Linda and the Evening Birds record several songs at the Gallo studios. One especially catches the record company’s attention: “Mbube,” a song inspired by an incident in the band’s Zulu childhood when they chased lions that were coming after their fathers’ cattle. Because blacks are not allowed to have royalties in 1930s South Africa, the studio gives the band a “petty cash voucher” in exchange for the rights to their song. “Mbube” (recorded 1938) becomes a hit record, selling up to 100,000 copies in the region, and Linda becomes a singing superstar among Zulu migrants in Johannesburg.

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Solomon Linda & The Evening Birds

 

Linda had received 10 shillings—roughly 87 cents today—for signing over the copyright of “Mbube” to Gallo Studios, the company that produced his group’s original record. As compensation, they also gave him a job sweeping floors and serving tea in their packing house.

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Solomon Linda - Mbube, 1938

 

In 1948 Pete Seeger, a young American folk singer living in Manhattan, receives a copy of “Mbube” from his friend Alan Lomax, who is working for a record company. Seeger is fascinated by the song and transcribes it for his band, the Weavers. In 1952, the song was covered as an instrumental by The Weavers as "Wimoweh", a mishearing of the chorus of 'uyimbube' (meaning "he is a lion"), and again in 1959 by The Kingston Trio.

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Pete Seeger

 

For The Tokens' 1961 cover, a new set of lyrics, "The Lion Sleeps Tonight", was written by George Weiss, Luigi Creatore, and Hugo Peretti, based upon the meaning of the original song. Composer George David Weiss is sent in to re-make the song for the band. Weiss makes Linda’s melody the main part and adds the famous lyrics “In the jungle, the mighty jungle…”.

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George David Weiss

 

Controversy still remains between The Tokens and Weiss over who was the true author of the song. Drummer Phil Margo claims Weiss stole The Tokens’ idea for the cover and inserted his own lyrics, while singer Jay Siegel says: “George David Weiss was the person who actually did write the lyrics to ‘The Lion Sleeps Tonight,’ but Solomon Linda is the one who wrote most of the music, and I am the one who wrote all the different parts of that. The second eight bars of ‘The Lion Sleeps Tonight’ was my melody.”

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The Tokens

 

The Tokens’ “The Lion Sleeps Tonight” becomes an international number one hit. Within two years, there had been over 150 cover versions worldwide, in languages from Japanese to Finnish. Linda’s name had once again disappeared from the writers’ credits.

The song continues to inspire covers by artists such as Brian Eno and Robert John, who releases a number-three hit version in 1972. Every radio play results in a performance royalty: Weiss receives all composer royalties, while Pete Seeger and The Weavers receive the publisher royalties, even though Seeger openly acknowledges Linda as the song’s true author. Seeger later sends Linda a check for $1,000 and instructs his publisher send all future payments to Linda’s family—but the company does not.

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The Tokens - The Lion Sleeps Tonight

 

The South African group Ladysmith Black Mambazo releases a version of the song (1994). “The Lion Sleeps Tonight” regains popularity with the Disney film 'The Lion King,' which also becomes a Broadway musical. In July 2004 the song became the subject of a lawsuit between the family of its writer Solomon Linda and Disney. The suit claims that Disney owes $1.6 million in royalties for its use in the film.

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Ladysmith Black Mambazo, 1968

 

According to South African journalist Rian Malan:

“ ‘Mbube’ wasn't the most remarkable tune, but there was something terribly compelling about the underlying chant, a dense meshing of low male voices above which Solomon yodelled and howled for two exhilarating minutes, occasionally making it up as he went along. The third take was the great one, but it achieved immortality only in its dying seconds, when Solly [Solomon Linda] took a deep breath, opened his mouth and improvised the melody that the world now associates with these words:

In the jungle, the mighty jungle, the lion sleeps tonight.”

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Lion Sleeps Tonight

 

The Tokens - The lion sleeps tonight


In the jungle, the mighty jungle
The lion sleeps tonight
In the jungle the quiet jungle
The lion sleeps tonight

Near the village the peaceful village
The lion sleeps tonight
Near the village the quiet village
The lion sleeps tonight

Hush my darling, don't fear my darling
The lion sleeps tonight
Hush my darling, don't fear my darling
The lion sleeps tonight

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The Kingston Trio

 

Ladysmith Black Mambazo - Mbube (Wimoweh)


A family lived close to the jungle
At the end of the day they all sit together around the fire
They have their supper and relax and talk a little
The youngest boy becomes afraid

He hears all the sounds of the wild animals in the forest
Cheetahs, wolves jackals and lions
He starts crying at the darkness
And wild sounds that fill him with fear

Then his mother takes him in her arms
And sings to him
The family is always strong together
They protect one another

Grandparents, his father and mother
Uncles, aunts, cousins brothers and sisters
They all join and sing together
Soon he falls asleep, only the beautiful song fills his ears

Mbube, mbube, mbube, mbube
Mbube, mbube, mbube, mbube

In the jungle, the mighty jungle
The lion sleeps tonight
In the jungle, the mighty jungle
The lion sleeps tonight

Hush, my baby, don't fear my darling
The lion sleeps tonight
Hush, my baby, don't fear my darling
The lion sleeps tonight

Mbube, mbube, mbube, mbube
Mbube, mbube, mbube, mbube
Mbube, mbube, mbube, mbube
Mbube, mbube, mbube, mbube

In the jungle, the mighty jungle
The lion sleeps tonight
In the jungle, the mighty jungle
The lion sleeps tonight

Hush, my baby, don't fear my darling
The lion sleeps tonight
Hush, my baby, don't fear my darling
The lion sleeps tonight

Mbube, mbube, mbube, mbube
Mbube, mbube, mbube, mbube

Mbube

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Lion Sleeps Tonight

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Pop and Misc. Notes Tue, 20 Jan 2015 17:40:34 +0000
Someone Like You (Van Morrison) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/16611-someone-like-you-van-morrison-song.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/notes/29-pop/16611-someone-like-you-van-morrison-song.html Someone Like You (Van Morrison)

Legendary singer-songwriter Van Morrison grew up listening to artists such as Ray Charles and Solomon Burke, as well as Woody Guthrie, Muddy Waters and Charlie Parker, courtesy of his father’s record collection. These artists made a real impact on his work, and much of his music has been influenced by the Celtic tradition, jazz as well as soul music and r&b.

Someone Like You

George Ivan Morrison was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, on August 31, 1945; his mother was a singer, while his father ardently collected classic American jazz and blues recordings. At 15, he quit school to join the local R&B band The Monarchs, touring military bases throughout Europe before returning home to form his own group, Them.

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Van Morrison

 

By 1967, at the age of 22, he had already composed the standards “Gloria” and “Brown Eyed Girl,” which remain two of his best-known songs. But the idiosyncratic and complicated Morrison was always a one-man gang at heart, and the inevitable launch of his solo career would bring to bear the intensely sad, sublime and inventive chamber pop of 'Astral Weeks,' an instantly legendary album whose luminous power has only increased with age.

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Van Morrison

 

The first half of the 1970s was the most fertile creative period of Morrison's career. From 'Moondance' onward, his records reflected an increasingly celebratory and profoundly mystical outlook spurred on in large part by his marriage to wife Janet Planet and the couple's relocation to California. Moondance became his first million selling album and reached number twenty-nine on the Billboard charts.

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Van Morrison

 

The Van who resurfaced from self-imposed exile emerged unchastened by his mainstream failures and eager to push the envelope further still. The series of frequently ingenious records he made starting in the late ’70s and onto the early ’90s both benefited from his profound grounding in R&B and soul and freed him from them at the same time. His experimentations with synths and atmospherics were every bit the equal of the groundbreaking work being done by Brian Eno and Daniel Lanois. His preoccupations became steadily more spiritual in nature, although the bile of his industry-related frustrations never abated. It all came together on the stunning 1986 release 'No Guru, No Method, No Teacher,' an astoundingly underappreciated album.

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Van Morrison

 

From his earliest days, Van Morrison has channeled the influences of music giants. His music has defied boundaries, offering everything from the swinging soul-jazz of 'Moondance' to the traditional Celtic styles of 'Irish Heartbeat.' In the last few decades, he has collaborated with a range of artists including John Lee Hooker, Mose Allison, and Tom Jones, and dedicated projects to celebrating and re-exploring his blues, jazz, skiffle, and country roots.

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Van Morrison

 

"Someone Like You" is a popular, romantic ballad recorded on his 1987 album, 'Poetic Champions Compose.' It has become a wedding and movie classic.

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Someone Like You, single

 

'Poetic Champions Compose' is the seventeenth studio album by Van Morrison, released on Mercury. As described by Brian Hinton: "It is an album which is more than the sum of its parts, exuding an overall sense of calm and optimism." In 1987 the single "Someone Like You" charted at #28 on the Billboard Adult Contemporary in the U. S.

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Poetic Champions Compose, cover

 

Amongst the major musical titans emerging during the second half of the 20th century, the Irish soul troubadour Van Morrison is perhaps the most underappreciated — a figure every bit the equal of Dylan, Young, and Cohen in terms of achievement and influence — but somehow one also subtly marginalized in the annals of music history.

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Someone Like You

 

Van Morrison - Someone like You


I've been searching a long time
For someone exactly like you
I've been travelling all around the world
Waiting for you to come through.
Someone like you makes it
All worth while
Someone like you keeps
Me satisfied someone exactly
Like you

I've been travellin a hard road
Lookin for someone exactly like you
I've been carryin my heavy load
Waiting for the light to come
Shining through.
Someone like you makes it
All worth while
Someone like you keeps
Me satisfied. someone exactly
Like you.

I've been doin some soul searching
To find out where you're at
I've been up and down the highway
In all kinds of foreign lands

Someone like you...

I've been all around the world
Marching to the beat of a different
Drum.
But just lately I have
Realised
The best is yet to come.

Someone like you...

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Someone Like You

 

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluelover) Pop and Misc. Notes Sun, 28 Sep 2014 21:44:39 +0000