Rock, Metal The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/113.html Thu, 06 Oct 2022 00:39:04 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Lou Reed & John Cale - Songs For Drella (1990) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/113-loureed/189-reedcaledrella.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/113-loureed/189-reedcaledrella.html Lou Reed & John Cale - Songs For Drella (1990)


1.	"Small Town" - 2:04
2.	"Open House" - 4:18
3.	"Style It Takes" - 2:54
4.	"Work" - 2:38
5.	"Trouble with Classicists" - 3:42
6.	"Starlight" - 3:28
7.	"Faces and Names" - 4:12 
8.	"Images" - 3:31
9.	"Slip Away (A Warning)" - 3:05
10.	"It Wasn't Me" - 3:30
11.	"I Believe" - 3:18
12.	"Nobody But You" - 3:46
13.	"A Dream" - 6:33
14.	"Forever Changed" - 4:52
15.	"Hello It's Me" - 3:13
Musicians:
    John Cale – vocals, keyboards, viola
    Lou Reed – vocals, guitar

 

John Cale, the co-founder of The Velvet Underground, left the group in 1968 after tensions between himself and Lou Reed became intolerable; neither had much charitable to say about one other after that, and they seemed to share only one significant area of agreement -- they both maintained a great respect and admiration for Andy Warhol, the artist whose patronage of the group helped them reach their first significant audience. So it was fitting that after Warhol's death in 1987, Reed and Cale began working together for the first time since White Light/White Heat on a cycle of songs about the artist's life and times. Starkly constructed around Cale's keyboards, Reed's guitar, and their voices, Songs for Drella is a performance piece about Andy Warhol, his rise to fame, and his troubled years in the limelight. Reed and Cale take turns on vocals, sometimes singing as the character of Andy and elsewhere offering their observations on the man they knew. On a roll after New York, Reed's songs are strong and pithy, and display a great feel for the character of Andy, and while Cale brought fewer tunes to the table, they're all superb, especially "Style It Takes" and "A Dream," a spoken word piece inspired by Warhol's posthumously published diaries. If Songs for Drella seems modest from a musical standpoint, it's likely neither Reed nor Cale wanted the music to distract from their story, and here they paint a portrait of Warhol that has far more depth and poignancy than his public image would have led one to expect. It's a moving and deeply felt tribute to a misunderstood man, and it's a pleasure to hear these two comrades-in-arms working together again, even if their renewed collaboration was destined to be short-lived. ---Mark Deming, allmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Lou Reed Mon, 12 Oct 2009 09:52:55 +0000
Lou Reed - Berlin (1973) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/113-loureed/187-reedberlin1973.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/113-loureed/187-reedberlin1973.html Lou Reed - Berlin (1973)

Side one

   1. "Berlin" – 3:23
   2. "Lady Day" – 3:40
   3. "Men of Good Fortune" – 4:37
   4. "Caroline Says I" – 3:57
   5. "How Do You Think It Feels" – 3:42
   6. "Oh, Jim" – 5:13

Side two

   1. "Caroline Says II" – 4:10
   2. "The Kids" – 7:55
   3. "The Bed" – 5:51
   4. "Sad Song" – 6:55

Personnel:
    Lou Reed – vocals, acoustic guitar
    Bob Ezrin – piano, mellotron, production, arrangement
    Michael Brecker – tenor sax
    Randy Brecker – trumpet
    Jack Bruce – bass; except "Lady Day" & "The Kids"
    Aynsley Dunbar – drums; except "Lady Day" & "The Kids"
    Steve Hunter – electric guitar
    Tony Levin – bass on "The Kids"
    Allan Macmillan – piano on "Berlin"
    Gene Martynec – acoustic guitar, synthesizer and vocal arrangement on "The Bed," bass on "Lady Day"
    Jon Pierson – bass trombone
    Dick Wagner – background vocals & electric guitar
    Blue Weaver – piano on "Men of Good Fortune"
    B.J. Wilson – drums on "Lady Day" & "The Kids"
    Steve Winwood – organ & harmonium
    Steve Hyden, Elizabeth March, Lou Reed, Dick Wagner – choir

 

Transformer and "Walk on the Wild Side" were both major hits in 1972, to the surprise of both Lou Reed and the music industry, and with Reed suddenly a hot commodity, he used his newly won clout to make the most ambitious album of his career, Berlin. Berlin was the musical equivalent of a drug-addled kid set loose in a candy store; the album's songs, which form a loose story line about a doomed romance between two chemically fueled bohemians, were fleshed out with a huge, boomy production (Bob Ezrin at his most grandiose) and arrangements overloaded with guitars, keyboards, horns, strings, and any other kitchen sink that was handy (the session band included Jack Bruce, Steve Winwood, Aynsley Dunbar, and Tony Levin). And while Reed had often been accused of focusing on the dark side of life, he and Ezrin approached Berlin as their opportunity to make The Most Depressing Album of All Time, and they hardly missed a trick. This all seemed a bit much for an artist who made such superb use of the two-guitars/bass/drums lineup with the Velvet Underground, especially since Reed doesn't even play electric guitar on the album; the sheer size of Berlin ultimately overpowers both Reed and his material. But if Berlin is largely a failure of ambition, that sets it apart from the vast majority of Reed's lesser works; Lou's vocals are both precise and impassioned, and though a few of the songs are little more than sketches, the best -- "How Do You Think It Feels," "Oh, Jim," "The Kids," and "Sad Song" -- are powerful, bitter stuff. It's hard not to be impressed by Berlin, given the sheer scope of the project, but while it earns an A for effort, the actual execution merits more of a B-. ---Mark Deming, allmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Lou Reed Mon, 12 Oct 2009 09:49:49 +0000
Lou Reed - Greatest Hits (Steel Box Collection) [2008] http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/113-loureed/15016-lou-reed-greatest-hits-steel-box-collection-2008.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/113-loureed/15016-lou-reed-greatest-hits-steel-box-collection-2008.html Lou Reed - Greatest Hits (Steel Box Collection) [2008]

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1. Wild child 
2. Walk on the wild side 
3. Vicious 
4. Satellite of love 
5. Caroline says I 
6. Sally can't dance 
7. Temporary thing 
8. Coney Island baby 
9. Shooting star 
10. The gun 
11. Tell it to your heart 
12. I love you Suzanne

 

Originally released in 2006 as Collections, the budget-priced Greatest Hits [Steel Box] compilation features 12 songs from Lou Reed's late-70s/early-80s output, including obvious hits like "Walk on the Wild Side," "Satellite of Love," and "Vicious," as well as deeper cuts like "Tell It to Your Heart" from 1986's wildly uneven Mistrial and "The Gun" from 1982's over-looked Blue Mask album. It's by no means definitive, nor does it make a lick of sense, but there are enough decent tracks to not turn it into a coaster. ---James Christopher Monger, Rovi

 

Singer, songwriter and guitarist Lou Reed was born on March 2, 1942, in Brooklyn, New York. In 1965, he co-founded the Velvet Underground, a rock band managed by Andy Warhol. Reed went solo in the 1970s, scoring a hit with the song "Walk on the Wild Side" and releasing more than 16 albums, including Coney Island Baby and Berlin. He died on October 27, 2013, at age 71. Lou Reed was born Lewis Allan Reed at Beth El Hospital in Brooklyn, New York, on March 2, 1942. He spent most of his childhood in Long Island, where he grew up in a Jewish family. Reed took an early interest in music and played guitar in several bands during his high school years. During this period, he underwent electroshock therapy intended to cure him of his bisexuality.

Reed graduated from Syracuse University, where he studied writing and film. After college, he moved to New York City and began writing songs for Pickwick Records.

In 1964, Reed scored a minor hit with the parody single "The Ostrich." Pickwick hired a band, including future Velvet Underground bandmate John Cale, to back Reed's vocals. The two became friends, collaborators and roommates. Reed and Cale recruited Reed's college acquaintances, guitarist Sterling Morrison and drummer Maureen Tucker, to join a band they called the Velvet Underground. The group soon caught the attention of artist Andy Warhol, who incorporated them into his regular parties and introduced them to the New York art scene. Warhol claimed some ownership of the band, compelling them to take on European model Nico as a singer on their debut album. Despite their resistance, the first Velvet Underground album, called The Velvet Underground & Nico, is considered one of the most influential in rock history. Some of Reed's songs, including "Heroin," addressed his growing drug use.

The volatile combination of personalities within the band could not coexist peacefully for long. By the time the band recorded their next album, White Light/White Heat, both Nico and Warhol were no longer participants. Cale and Reed clashed, driving Cale from the band. The Velvet Underground released two more albums with more pop-oriented tracks by Reed, including "Sweet Jane." In 1970, Reed left the band, retiring to his parents' home on Long Island. Lou Reed briefly worked at his father's tax accounting firm before signing a solo recording contract with RCA Records. His first album, Lou Reed, contained re-recorded versions of unreleased Velvet Underground songs, and was not a commercial or critical success.

In 1972, Reed released Transformer. Co-produced by David Bowie, the album contained the hit single "Walk on the Wild Side," which paid tribute to the hustlers and transvestites Reed had met through Andy Warhol, and the song "Perfect Day." The record is widely considered to be the pinnacle of Reed's solo career.

Following Transformer, Reed recorded a number of albums with wildly differing styles and cultivated an antagonistic and erratic persona. The 1975 electronic double album Metal Music Machine, in particular, was inaccessible to the point of being commercially untenable. Some critics interpreted it as a gesture of contempt toward Reed's record label and even his fans—a charge that Reed denied.

In an interview with Rolling Stone magazine in 1987, Reed stated, "All through this, I've always thought that if you thought of all of it as a book then you have the Great American Novel, every record as a chapter. They're all in chronological order. You take the whole thing, stack it and listen to it in order, there's my Great American Novel."

A Velvet Underground reunion in 1990 was short-lived—a result of quarreling between Cale and Reed. Reed continued to perform and record into his later years, releasing more than 16 albums over the course of his long career. In 2013, Lou Reed became very ill. He canceled several of his scheduled performances, including his appearance at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in March of that year. At the time, he blamed "unavoidable complications" for pulling out of these shows. It was later revealed that he had been suffering from liver failure.

Reed received a liver transplant in May 2013. The operation was done at a hospital in Cleveland, Ohio. News about Reed's transplant broke that June, while the rocker was still on the mend from his major medical procedure. He credited his return to health to his medical treatment. "I am a triumph of modern medicine, physics and chemisty," he wrote on his website. Reed also believed that his healthy lifestyle and tai chi practice had helped his body recover from the illness and surgery.

Reed expressed his desire to record new songs and return to performing, but he didn't get the chance to delve back into his music career for long. He died on October 27, 2013. He was 71 years old. LIver disease was determined to be the cause of his death.

Reed married British designer Sylvia Morales in 1980. The couple eventually divorced. In 2008, Reed married musician and performance artist Laurie Anderson. In addition to shaping rock 'n' roll for nearly 50 years and being an inspiration to rock musicians worldwide, Reed published two books of photographs during his lifetime: Emotions in Action and Lou Reed's New York. ---biography.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Lou Reed Wed, 30 Oct 2013 16:47:36 +0000
Lou Reed - Magic And Loss (1992) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/113-loureed/12795-lou-reed-magic-and-loss-1992.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/113-loureed/12795-lou-reed-magic-and-loss-1992.html Lou Reed - Magic And Loss (1992)

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1 Dorita (The Spirit) 	1:07 	
2 What's Good (The Thesis) 	3:22 	
3 Power And Glory (The Situation) 4:23 	
4 Magician (Internally) 	6:23 	
5 Sword Of Damocles (Externally) 	3:42 	
6 Goodby Mass (In A Chapel Bodily Termination) 	4:25 	
7 Cremation (Ashes To Ashes) 	2:54 	
8 Dreamin' (Escape) 	5:09 	
9 No Chance (Regret) 	3:15 	
10 Warrior King (Revenge) 	4:27 	
11 Harry's Circumcision (Reverie Gone Astray) 	5:29 	
12 Gassed And Stoked (Loss) 	4:18 	
13 Power And Glory Part II (Magic - Transformation) 	2:57 	
14 Magic And Loss (The Summation) 	6:39

Personnel
    Lou Reed - vocals, acoustic & electric guitar
    Mike Rathke - guitar
    Rob Wasserman - bass
    Michael Blair - drums, percussion, background vocals
    Roger Moutenot - background vocals
    Little Jimmy Scott - background vocals

 

With 1982's The Blue Mask, Lou Reed began approaching more mature and challenging themes in his music, and in 1992, Reed decided it was time to tackle the Most Serious Theme of All -- Death. Reed lost two close friends to cancer within the space of a year, and the experience informed Magic and Loss, a set of 14 songs about loss, illness, and mortality. It would have been easy for a project like this to sound morbid, but Reed avoids that; the emotions that dominate these songs are fear and helplessness in the face of a disease (and a fate) not fully understood, and Reed's songs struggle to balance these anxieties with bravery, humor, and an understanding of the notion that death is an inevitable part of life -- that you can't have the magic without the loss. It's obvious that Reed worked on this material with great care, and Magic and Loss contains some of his most intelligent and emotionally intense work as a lyricist. However, Reed hits many of the same themes over and over again, and while Reed and his accompanists -- guitarist Mike Rathke, bassist Rob Wasserman, and percussionist Michael Blair -- approach the music with skill and impeccable chops, many of these songs are a bit samey; the album's most memorable tunes are the ones that pull it out of its mid-tempo rut, like the grooving "What's Good" and the guitar workout "Gassed and Stoked." Magic and Loss is an intensely heartfelt piece of music, possessing a taste and subtlety one might never have expected from Reed, but its good taste almost works against it; it's a sincere bit of public mourning, but perhaps a more rousing wake might have been a more meaningful tribute to the departed. ---Mark Deming, almusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Lou Reed Mon, 10 Sep 2012 18:26:19 +0000
Lou Reed - Rock N' Roll Animal (1974) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/113-loureed/15034-lou-reed-rock-n-roll-animal-1974.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/113-loureed/15034-lou-reed-rock-n-roll-animal-1974.html Lou Reed - Rock N' Roll Animal (1974)

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1.    "Intro/Sweet Jane" (Hunter, Reed) – 7:48
2.    "Heroin" – 13:12
3.    "How Do You Think It Feels" – 3:41
4.    "Caroline Says I" – 4:06
5.    "White Light/White Heat" – 4:55
6.    "Lady Day" – 4:05
7.    "Rock 'n' Roll" – 10:21

Line-up:
    Lou Reed – vocals
    Pentti "Whitey" Glan – drums, percussion
    Steve Hunter – guitars
    Prakash John – bass, vocals
    Dick Wagner – guitar, vocal
    Ray Colcord – keyboards

 

In 1974, after the commercial disaster of his album Berlin, Lou Reed needed a hit, and Rock N Roll Animal was a rare display of commercial acumen on his part, just the right album at just the right time. Recorded in concert with Reed's crack road band at the peak of their form, Rock N Roll Animal offered a set of his most anthemic songs (most dating from his days with the Velvet Underground) in arrangements that presented his lean, effective melodies and street-level lyrics in their most user-friendly form (or at least as user friendly as an album with a song called "Heroin" can get). Early-'70s arena rock bombast is often the order of the day, but guitarists Dick Wagner and Steve Hunter use their six-string muscle to lift these songs up, not weigh them down, and with Reed's passionate but controlled vocals riding over the top, "Sweet Jane," "White Light/White Heat," and "Rock 'n' Roll" finally sound like the radio hits they always should have been. Reed would rarely sound this commercial again, but Rock N Roll Animal proves he could please a crowd when he had to. The revised CD reissue of Rock N Roll Animal released in 2000 offers markedly better sound than the album's initial release, along with two bonus cuts that give a better idea of how this band approached the material from Berlin on-stage, as well as an amusing moment of Reed verbally sparring with a heckler. --- Mark Deming, allmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Lou Reed Sat, 02 Nov 2013 19:39:18 +0000
Lou Reed - Super Golden Radio Shows (1972) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/113-loureed/15006-lou-reed-super-golden-radio-shows-1972.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/113-loureed/15006-lou-reed-super-golden-radio-shows-1972.html Lou Reed - Super Golden Radio Shows (1972)

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01 - White Light White Heat
02 - Vicious
03 - I'm Waiting For The Man
04 - Walk It Talk It
05 - Sweet Jane
06 - Heroin
07 - Satellite of Love
08 - Walk On the Wild Side
09 - I'm So Free
10 - Berlin
11 - Rock "n" Roll

Lou Reed – vocals, guitar
and The Tots:
Vinny Laporta – guitar
Eddie Reynolds – guitar
Bobby Resigno – bass
Scottie Clark - drums

Ultrasonic Recording Studio, WLIR FM, Hempstead NY, 1972-12-26
Super Golden Radio Shows

 

This show has been released in one bootleg form or another under at least 10 different titles. It features Reed in excellent form. Playing guitar and singing such that one can clearly hear and appreciate his literate lyrics, Reed delivers a rock-solid performance. Lou's backing band, The Tots, put on an incredible show. Sometimes prone to unfocused and less-than-energetic performances, The Tots put on the show of their lives here. This is Lou Reed without props, without camp, and just in your face Rock 'N' Roll.

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Lou Reed Mon, 28 Oct 2013 16:47:48 +0000
Lou Reed – Ecstasy (2000) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/113-loureed/188-reedecstasy.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/113-loureed/188-reedecstasy.html Lou Reed – Ecstasy (2000)


1. Paranoia Key of E 
2. Mystic Child 
3. Mad 
4. Ecstasy 
5. Modern Dance 
6. Tatters 
7. Future Farmers of America 
8. Turning Time Around 
9. White Prism 
10. Rock Minuet 
11. Baton Rouge 
12. Like a Possum 
13. Rouge 
14. Big Sky

Musicians:
    Lou Reed - vocals, guitar, percussion on "White Prism"
    Mike Rathke - guitar
    Fernando Saunders - bass, background vocals
    Tony "Thunder" Smith - drums, percussion, background vocals
    Don Alias - percussion on "Ecstasy"
    Laurie Anderson - electric violin on "White Prism," "Rouge" and "Rock Minuet"
    Steven Bernstein - trumpet, horn arrangements
    Doug Wieselman - baritone & tenor saxophone
    Paul Shapiro - tenor saxophone
    Jane Scarpantoni - cello

 

Never let it be said that Lou Reed has lost the ability to surprise his audience; who would have thought that at the age of 58, on his first album of the new millennium, Reed would offer us an 18-minute guitar distortion workout with lyrics abut kinky sex, dangerous drugs, and (here's the surprise) imagining what it would be like to be a possum? For the most part, Ecstasy finds Reed obsessed with love and sex, though (as you might expect) his take on romance is hardly rosy ("Paranoia Key of E," "Mad," and "Tatters" all document a relationship at the point of collapse, while "Baton Rouge" is an eccentric but moving elegy for a love that didn't last) and Eros is usually messy ("White Prism"), obsessive ("Ecstasy"), or unhealthy and perverse ("Rock Minuet"). Reed genuinely seems to be stretching towards new lyrical and musical ground here, but while some of his experiments work, several pointedly do not, with the epic "Like a Possum" only the album's most spectacular miscalculation. Still, Reed and producer Hal Wilner take some chances with the arrangements that pay off, particularly the subtle horn charts that dot several songs, and Reed's superb rhythm section (Fernando Saunders on bass and Tony "Thunder" Smith on drums) gives these songs a rock-solid foundation for the leader's guitar workouts. As Reed and his band hit fifth gear on the album's rousing closer, "Big Sky," he once again proves that even his uneven works include a few songs you'll certainly want to have in your collection -- as long as they're not about possums. ---Mark Deming, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Lou Reed Mon, 12 Oct 2009 09:51:12 +0000