Rock, Metal The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1401.html Fri, 29 May 2020 08:44:44 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Evanescence - Evanescence (2011) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1401-evanescence/11117-evanescence-evanescence-2011.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1401-evanescence/11117-evanescence-evanescence-2011.html Evanescence - Evanescence (2011)

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01. What You Want (3:41)
02. Made of Stone (3:32)
03. The Change (3:43)
04. My Heart is Broken (4:29)
05. The Other Side (4:04)		play
06. Erase This (3:52)
07. Lost in Paradise (4:42)
08. Sick (3:29)
09. End of the Dream (3:49)		play
10. Oceans (3:36)
11. Never Go Back (4:26)
12. Swimming Home (3:43)

Musicians:
Amy Lee – keyboards, harp, vocals
Terry Balsamo – guitar
Will Hunt – drums
Tim McCord – bass guitar
Troy McLawhorn – rhythm guitar
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Cello – Anja Wood, Claire Bryant, Dave Eggar 
Double Bass – Pete Donovan 
Violin – Claire Chan, Entcho Todorov, Maxim Moston, Michael Roth, Sarah Pratt, Suzy Perelman
Viola – Hiroko Taguchi, Jonathan Dinklage 

 

Difficult births are no stranger to Evanescence. Nothing ever quite seems to come easy for Amy Lee, yet the five years separating Evanescence’s 2006 sophomore effort The Open Door and its eponymous 2011 album were relatively quiet, the band undergoing some lineup changes -- not to mention a switch of producers, from Steve Lillywhite to Nick Raskulinecz -- but nothing comparable to the messy departure of Ben Moody between the group’s first two albums. Such comparative calm is reflected within the grooves of Evanescence, which is less tortured tonally even if it remains quite dramatic. Lee’s default mode is to sing to the rafters, her operatic bluster sometimes overbearing when her settings are gloomy, but Raskulinecz pulls off a nifty trick of brightening the murk, retaining all of the churning drama but lessening the oppression by brightening the colors and pushing the melody. While there’s hardly a danger of Amy Lee removing her thick mascara, she’s not pouting all the time; there’s some shade and light here, some variety of tempos, enough to give Evanescence the illusion of warmth, not to mention a fair share of crossover hooks. It’s aural candy for aging goths and tortured tweens alike. ---Stephen Thomas Erlewine, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Evanescence Wed, 14 Dec 2011 09:19:34 +0000
Evanescence - Fallen [2003] http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1401-evanescence/10953-evanescence-fallen-2003.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1401-evanescence/10953-evanescence-fallen-2003.html Evanescence - Fallen [2003]

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1.Going Under					play
2.Bring me to life
3.Everybody’s Fool				play
4.My Inmortal
5.Haunted
6.Tourniquet
7.Imaginary
8.Taking over me
9.Hello
10.My Last Breath
11.Whisper
12.Farther Away (Bonus track)
13. My Immortal (Band version) (Bonus track)

Personnel: 
Amy Lee (vocals); 
David Hodges (piano, keyboards, programming); 
Josh Freese (drums); 
Chris Johnson , Zac Baird (programming);
Francesco DiCosmo (bass);
Josh Freese, Rocky Gray (drums)

 

Fallen is the major-label debut of Evanescence, a Little Rock, AR-based quartet led by the soaring vocals of 20-year-old Amy Lee. Emboldened by the inclusion of its single "Bring Me to Life" on the soundtrack to the hit film Daredevil, Fallen debuted at an impressive number seven on Billboard's Top 40. But "Bring Me to Life" is a bit misleading. A flawless slice of Linkin Park-style anguish pop, it's actually a duet between Lee and 12 Stones' Paul McCoy. In fact, almost half of Fallen's 11 songs are piano-driven ballads that suggest Tori Amos if she wore too much mascara and recorded for the Projekt label. The other half of the album does include flashes of the single's PG-rated nu-metal ("Everybody's Fool," "Going Under"). But it's the symphonic goth rock of groups like Type O Negative that influences most of Fallen. Ethereal synths float above Ben Moody's crunching guitar in "Haunted," while "Whisper" even features apocalyptic strings and a scary chorus of Latin voices right out of Carmina Burana. "Tourniquet" is an anguished, urgent rocker driven by chugging guitars and spiraling synths, with brooding lyrics that reference Evanescence's Christian values: "Am I too lost to be saved?/Am I too lost?/My God! My tourniquet/Return to me salvation." The song is Fallen's emotional center point and defines the band's sound. --- Johnny Loftus, allmusic.com

 

Fallen, the debut album from Evanescence (a previously unknown quartet from Little Rock, Arkansas) was given a nice boost by the Daredevil soundtrack. Their songs "My Immortal" and the imposing "Bring Me to Life" are clear stand-outs in the film, mainly because they work so well with the dramatic, eerie undertones of the story line. They reappear here on the band's debut, alongside a selection of similarly brooding tracks that evoke pensive artists such as Tori Amos and the Cranberries. Vocalist Amy Lee has the kind of voice that can cause weeks of insomnia, but on songs such as "Tourniquet" and "Haunted" she belies the music's sinister mood with even-handed spirituality, thoughtfully letting some light shine through the tempest. ---Aidin Vaziri, Editorial Reviews

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Evanescence Tue, 29 Nov 2011 10:06:51 +0000
Evanescence - Greatest Hits CD1 (2008) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1401-evanescence/3993-evanescence-greatest-hits-cd1-2010.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1401-evanescence/3993-evanescence-greatest-hits-cd1-2010.html Evanescence - Greatest Hits CD1 (2008)

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01. Whisper
02. Call Me When You’re Sober
03. Bring Me To Life
04. Lacrymosa
05. Going Under
06. Sweet Sacrifice
07. My Immortal
08. Missing
09. Everybody’s Fool
10. Lithium
11. Imaginary
12. All That I’m Living For
13. Tourniquet
14. Away From Me
15. Taking Over Me
16. Lies
17. Lose Control
18. Before The Down
19. Good Enough
20. Heart Shaped Box

 

Evanescence (formed in 1995) is an American gothic influenced rock/metal band, best known for their breakthrough single “Bring Me to Life” and accompanying album “Fallen”, hailing from Little Rock, Arkansas, U.S.

Formed by lead singer Amy Lee and guitarist Ben Moody in 1995, the duo had met a year earlier at a youth camp in Little Rock, Arkansas. Lee and Moody subsequently began writing and recording songs together, which included the early tracks “Solitude”, “Give Unto Me”, “Understanding”, and “My Immortal”. A couple of these songs found their way onto local radio, following which the pair performed their first live show and settled on the name Evanescence. In 1998 the band released their debut self-titled EP, limited to a hundred copies, followed a year later by the EP “Whisper”.

Later in 1999 Evanescence invited keyboard player and drummer David Hodges to expand the lineup, who recorded on the band’s debut album “Origin” in 2000. Evanescence subsequently signed with Wind-up Records, who relocated the band to Los Angeles and gave them living and rehearsal space on top of vocal and acting classes. After two years, in which time drummer Rocky Gray, rhythm guitarist John LeCompt, and bassist Will Boyd were added to the lineup, the band completed their label debut.

Featuring Dave Fortman on production duties, Evanescence released “Fallen” in March 2003, becoming one of the year’s most successful albums. Debuting at No. 7 however rising to No. 3 on the Billboard 200, the gothic-inspired, metal crunching, climatic-pop release secured five Grammy nominations of which the band won Best New Artist and Best Hard Rock Performance. The record was led by the smash hit single “Bring Me to Life”, which charted in over 15 countries and secured platinum certification. The album transformed Evanescence into an internationally recognised group, and was supported by an extensive worldwide tour.

Following the supporting tour bassist Will Boyd left the group to spend time with his family, with former Revolution Smile guitarist Tim McCord taking his place. The band’s official sophomore album, “The Open Door”, was released in October 2006 and eclipsed the success of their debut by topping the U.S. Billboard 200. Led by the single “Call Me When You’re Sober”, the album earned a string of positive reviews and was once again supported with relentless touring.

In 2011 Evanescence returned from touring and time out to released their self-titled, third studio album. Once again topping the Billboard 200, the record is seen as a cohesive, creative, and progressive album for the group which lends infleunces from gothic rock, nu metal, and electro. Spanwing the singles “What You Want”, “My Heart is Broke”, and “Lost in Paradise”, the record’s supporting tour was alongside The Pretty Reckless and Fair to Midland. --songkick.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Evanescence Mon, 22 Mar 2010 00:01:49 +0000
Evanescence - The Open Door [2006] http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1401-evanescence/11001-evanescence-the-open-door-2006.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1401-evanescence/11001-evanescence-the-open-door-2006.html Evanescence - The Open Door [2006]

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1.Sweet Sacrifice					play
2.Call Me When You’re Sober			play
3.Weight of the World
4.Lithium
5.Cloud Nine
6.Snow White Queen
7.Lacrymosa
8.Like You
9.Lose Control
10.The Only One
11.Your Star
12.All That I’m Living For
13.Good Enough
14.If You Don't Mind (B-Side)
15.Call Me When You're Sober (Acoustic Version)

Personnel: 
Amy Lee (vocals, piano, programming); 
John LeCompt (guitar, programming); 
Terry Balsamo (guitar); 
Rocky Gray (drums); 
Bon Harris (programming); 
Carrie Lee (background vocals).

 

There's nothing like a breakup to focus your muse. This follow-up to the stunning, multi-platinum Fallen was penned as singer Amy Lee's troubled romance with bandmate Ben Moody was spiraling out of control, impelling her to craft an anxious record full of recriminations, revelation, and self-flagellation, as she questioned everything that kept her whole. It's a fascinating journey for the listener as she ventures into her own personal heart of darkness, her stricken, perfect voice suspended on an unsteady precipice between breakdown and breakthrough. Despite the loss of two members, including guitarist Moody who left mid-tour in 2003, the album has a maturity, sophistication, and a singular vision that wasn't found in their earlier work. Stately and as exotic as Led Zeppelin's Physical Graffiti, with its intricate instrumentation, disturbing imagery, and disembodied chorus, The Open Door shows exactly what this band is capable of. "Snow White Queen" is a goth-y alternative to Mariah Carey's "We Belong Together," equally anthemic, but with much more grit and pain. --Jaan Uhelszki, Editorial Reviews

 

It seems like a minor miracle that Evanescence released their second album at all, given the behind-the-scenes toil and trouble that surrounded the aftermath of their 2003 debut, Fallen, turning into an unexpected blockbuster. Actually, so much drama followed Evanescence that it's hardly the same band anymore. Certainly, pivotal songwriter/guitarist Ben Moody is no longer with the band, leaving not long after Fallen had become an international success, and sometime after that, they lost their bassist -- leaving behind Amy Lee as the indisputable leader of the band. She always was the face, voice, and spirit of the band anyway -- dominating so that it often seemed that she was named Evanescence and not fronting a band called that -- but by the time the group finally released their long-awaited second album, The Open Door, in October 2006, there was no question that it was her band, and she has learned well from the success of Fallen. Pushed to the background are the Tori-isms that constituted a good chunk of the debut -- they're saved for the brooding affirmation of a closer, "Good Enough," and the churning "Lithium," which most certainly is not a cover of Nirvana's classic (that song never mentioned its title, this repeats it incessantly) -- and in their place is the epic gothic rock (not quite the same thing as goth rock, mind you) that made Lee rock's leading witchy woman of the new millennium. And she doesn't hesitate to dig into the turmoil surrounding the band, since this truly is all about her -- she may artfully avoid the ugliness surrounding the lawsuit against her manager, whom she's alleged of sexual harassment, but she takes a few swipes against Moody, while hitting her semi-famous ex, Shaun Morgan of Seether, directly with "Call Me When You're Sober," as blunt a dismissal as they come. To hear her tell it, she not only doesn't need anybody, she's better on her own. Yet artists aren't always the best judge of their own work, and Lee could use somebody to help sculpt her sound into songs, the way she did when Moody was around. Not that she's flailing about necessarily -- "Call Me When You're Sober" not only has structure, it has hooks and momentum -- but far too often, The Open Door is a muddle of affections. Sonically, however, it captures the Evanescence mythos better and more consistently than the first album -- after all, Lee now has no apologies of being the thinking man's nu-metal chick, now that she's a star. ---Stephen Thomas Erlewine, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Evanescence Sat, 03 Dec 2011 11:39:18 +0000