Rock, Metal The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1605.html Sun, 05 Apr 2020 23:20:05 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb George Harrison - Extra Texture (1975) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1605-george-harrison/16010-george-harrison-extra-texture-1975.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1605-george-harrison/16010-george-harrison-extra-texture-1975.html George Harrison - Extra Texture (1975)

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Side One.
01 - You.
02 - The Answer At The End.
03 - This Guitar (Can't Keep From Crying).
04 - Ooh Baby (You Know That I Love You).
05 - Word Of Stone.

Side Two.
01 - A Bit More Of You.
02 - Can't Stop Thinking About You.
03 - Tired Of Midnight Blue.
04 - Grey Cloudy Lies.
05 - His Mama Is Legs (Ladies & Gentlemen)

George Harrison – Guitars, Vocals, ARP Synthesizer, Moog Synthesizer, Piano
Jesse Ed Davis – Guitar
David Foster - 	Keyboards, Organ, Piano, ARP Synthesizer
Nicky Hopkins -  Piano
Gary Wright - Keyboards, Organ, Piano,	ARP Synthesizer
Leon Russell - Keyboards, Piano, Vocals, Bass
Richard Tee - Keyboards
Carl Radle – Bass
Klaus Voormann – Bass
Willie Weeks – Bass
Jim Horn - Flute, Saxophone
Tom Scott - Horn, Saxophone
Chuck Findley – Horn
Jim Gordon – Drums
Jim Keltner - Drums, Percussion
Andy Newmark - Drums
Norma Kinney – Percussion
Emil Richards - Percussion

 

Despite George Harrison's reputation for solemn, lugubriously paced albums in the early '70s -- and this one is mostly no exception -- the jacket is full of jokes, from the eaten-away Apple logo (the Apple label would expire at year's end) to the punning title, the list of non-participants, and the mischievous grin of the ex-Beatle above the arch caption "OHNOTHIMAGEN" ("Oh, not him again!"). The record gets off to a great start with the instantly winning single "You" -- a bit of which is then repeated to open side two. But here, the basic idea and instrumental track come from February 1971, during George's most fertile period, dressed up with vocals and string synthesizer four years later. One of George's most beautifully harmonized, majestic, strangely underrated ballads "The Answer's at the End" -- whose inspiring lyric was based upon an inscription on George's home by its builder, Sir Frank Crisp -- comes next, followed by "This Guitar (Can't Keep from Crying)," an attractive sequel to "While My Guitar Gently Weeps." At this point, the devoted fan's hopes go up; could this be an unsung masterpiece? But George has fired off his best stuff first, and the record slowly and inexorably tails off, closing with a baffling salute to ex-Bonzo Dog Band member "Legs" Larry Smith. Yet despite its stretches of treadmill material, Extra Texture has worn better as a whole than its Apple neighbors Dark Horse and even much of Living in the Material World, for even the lesser tunes reveal a few musical blossoms upon re-listening and the front-loaded songs are among the best of his solo career. --- Richard S. Ginell, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) George Harrison Tue, 13 May 2014 15:44:51 +0000
George Harrison – Dark Horse (1974) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1605-george-harrison/9990-george-harrison-dark-horse-1974.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1605-george-harrison/9990-george-harrison-dark-horse-1974.html George Harrison – Dark Horse (1974)

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01. Hari's On Tour – 4:42
02. Simply Shady – 4:36
03. So Sad – 4:59
04. Bye Bye, Love – 4:05		play
05. Māya Love – 4:22
06. Ding Dong, Ding Dong – 3:38
07. Dark Horse – 3:52			play
08. Far East Man – 5:50
09. It Is "He" – 4:45

Personnel:
- George Harrison - vocals, guitar, bass
- Roger Kellaway - piano 
- Tom Scott - horns 
- John Guerin - drums 
- Max Bennett - bass 
- Robben Ford - guitar 
- Ringo Starr - drums 
- Jim Keltner - drums 
- Nicky Hopkins - piano 
- Willie Weeks - bass 
- Eric Clapton - guitar 
- Billy Preston - electric piano 
- Andy Newmark - drums 
- Gary Wright - piano 
- Klaus Voormann - bass 
- Mick Jones - guitar 
- Ron Wood - guitar 
- Alvin Lee - guitar 
- Chuck Findley - horns 
- Emil Richards - marimba 

 

With his first solo tour looming ahead in November and December of 1974, George Harrison felt impelled to rush out a new album, and even a steadily worsening case of laryngitis wouldn't stop him. Would that it did, for the appallingly weak state of his voice would torpedo this album and the tour, to his great embarrassment. "Hari's on Tour (Express)" -- with Tom Scott's L.A. Express churning out all-pro L.A.-studio jazz/rock -- gets the doomed project off to a spirited start, but it's an instrumental, and Harrison's vocal distress becomes obvious to all in the next track, "Simply Shady." Some of George's tunes -- particularly the title track and the exquisite "Far East Man" -- might have benefited from waiting for a better time to record, while others probably could not have been saved. The recording quality, like the voice, has a raw, coarse-grained sound that belies the impeccable musicianship. Dark Horse is perhaps most notorious for Harrison's bitter, slipshod rewrite of the Everly Brothers' hit "Bye Bye Love" -- referring openly to George's wife Pattie running off with Eric Clapton and, for good measure, having both of them on the session! Dark Horse would also be the name of Harrison's soon-to-be-formed new label, as well as a metaphor for the underestimated Beatle who leaped artistically and commercially ahead of his three colleagues immediately after the Beatles' breakup. Unfortunately, this album -- despite its humorous Sgt. Pepper parody on the cover and outright plea to critics on the margins of the inside jacket to go easy on its contents -- would only undermine Harrison's hard-fought campaign for respect. ---Richard S. Ginell, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) George Harrison Wed, 10 Aug 2011 13:45:45 +0000
George Harrison – George Harrison (1979/2004) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1605-george-harrison/10010-george-harrison-george-harrison-1979.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1605-george-harrison/10010-george-harrison-george-harrison-1979.html George Harrison – George Harrison (1979/2004)

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01. Love Comes To Everyone – 4:34
02. Not Guilty – 3:33
03. Here Comes The Moon – 4:47
04. Soft-Hearted Hana – 4:01		play
05. Blow Away – 3:58
06. Faster – 4:45
07. Dark Sweet Lady – 3:22		play
08. Your Love Is Forever – 3:43
09. Soft Touch – 3:58
10. If You Believe (George Harrison/Gary Wright) – 2:55
Bonus:
11. Here Comes The Moon (demo version) - 3:35

Personnel:
- George Harrison - guitars, vocals & backing vocals, bass (06)
- Andy Newmark - drums
- Willie Weeks - bass
- Neil Larsen - keyboards, mini Moog
- Ray Cooper - percussion
- Steve Winwood - Polymoog, Harmonium, mini Moog, backing vocals
- Emil Richards - marimba
- Gale Levant - harp
- Eric Clapton - guitar intro (01)
- Gary Wright - Oberheim (10)
- Del Newman - string and horn arrangements

 

George Harrison is, except for the overdubbed London strings, a painstakingly polished L.A.-made product -- and not a particularly inspired one at that. It's an ordinary album from an extraordinary talent. "Love Comes to Everyone" leads it off on a depressing note -- it's a treadmill tune with greeting-card verses -- and there are too many other such half-hearted songs lurking here, although some are salvaged by a nice instrumental touch: there's a catchy recurring guitar riff on "Soft Touch" and some lovely slide guitar on "Your Love Is Forever." Compared to the original, tougher Beatles version that was left off the White Album, the remake of "Not Guilty" is an easy listening trifle, though it was a revelation when it came out (the original had to wait until 1996 and Anthology 3 for an official release), and the succeeding "Here Comes the Moon" is a lazy retake on another Beatles song. "Blow Away" would be the record's most attractive new song -- and a number 16 hit -- but "Faster," a paean to Harrison's passion for Formula One auto racing, probably better reflected where his head was at this time. There are a few quirks: "Soft-Hearted Hana" is a strange, stream-of-consciousness Hawaiian hallucination, and "Dark Sweet Lady" is a Latin-flavored tune written for his new wife, Olivia. Finally, the inevitable spiritual benediction "If You Believe" offers some thoughtful philosophy to ponder, even if it's not an especially memorable tune. ---Richard S. Ginell, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) George Harrison Sat, 13 Aug 2011 11:13:59 +0000
George Harrison – Thirty Three and 1/3 (1976) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1605-george-harrison/5014-george-harrison-thirty-three-and-13.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1605-george-harrison/5014-george-harrison-thirty-three-and-13.html George Harrison – Thirty Three and 1/3 (1976)

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01. Woman Don't You Cry For Me – 3:17
02. Dear One – 5:08
03. Beautiful Girl – 3:37
04. This Song – 4:13
05. See Yourself – 2:50
06. It's What You Value – 5:07
07. True Love (Cole Porter) – 2:45
08. Pure Smokey – 3:54
09. Crackerbox Palace – 3:57
10. Learning How To Love You – 4:13

Personnel:
- George Harrison - lead vocals, guitars, synthesizers and percussion
- Willie Weeks - bass
- Alvin Taylor - drums
- Gary Wright - keyboards
- Richard Tee - piano, organ and Fender Rhodes
- Billy Preston - piano, organ and synthesizer
- David Foster - Fender Rhodes and clavinet
- Tom Scott - saxophone, flute and lyricon
- Emil Richards – marimba

 

Having suffered the humiliation of being sued successfully over "My Sweet Lord," George Harrison turned the ordeal into music, writing "This Song," a Top 25 hit. Even better was "Crackerbox Palace," which would have fit in nicely on any Beatles album. The rest was slight, although Harrison covering Cole Porter's "True Love" is an interesting idea. This was Harrison's first album on Dark Horse, his custom label, formed after the completion of his contract with EMI/Capitol in June 1976 and initially distributed by A&M. ---William Ruhlmann, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) George Harrison Wed, 09 Jun 2010 22:16:52 +0000
George Harrison – Wonderwall Music (1968) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1605-george-harrison/5013-george-harrison-wonderwall-music-by-george-harrison-1968.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1605-george-harrison/5013-george-harrison-wonderwall-music-by-george-harrison-1968.html George Harrison – Wonderwall Music (1968)

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01. Microbes – 3:40
02. Red Lady Too – 1:54
03. Tabla And Pakavaj – 1:05
04. In The Park – 4:07
05. Drilling A Home – 3:07
06. Guru Vandana – 1:04
07. Greasy Legs – 1:26
08. Ski-Ing – 1:50
09. Gat Kirwani – 1:15
10. Dream Scene – 5:25
11. Party Seacombe – 4:33
12. Love Scene – 4:16
13. Crying – 1:13
14. Cowboy Music – 1:27
15. Fantasy Sequins – 1:49
16. On The Bed – 1:03
17. Glass Box – 2:20
18. Wonderwall To Be Here – 1:24
19. Singing Om – 1:54
Tracks 2, 5, 8, 10, 11, 14, 17 and 18 were recorded in England,
while tracks 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 12, 13, 15, 16 and 19 were recorded in India.

Personnel:
England (December 1967)
- John Barham – piano and flügelhorn
- Colin Manley – guitar and steel guitar
- Tony Ashton – jangle piano and organ
- Philip Rogers – bass
- Roy Dyke – drums
- Tommy Reilly – harmonica
* Peter Tork – banjo (uncredited)
* Eddie Clayton (Eric Clapton) – guitar (rumoured)
* Richie Snare (Ringo Starr) – drums (rumoured)

India (January 1968)
- Aashish Khan – sarod
- Mahapurush Misra – tabla and pakavaj
- Sharad Jadev – shehnai
- Hanuman Jadev – shehnai
- Shambu-Das – sitar
- Indril Bhattacharya – sitar
- Shankar Ghosh – sitar
- Chandra Shekhar – surbahar
- Shivkumar Sharma – santoor
- S.R. Kenkare – flute
- Vinaik Vora – thar-shehnai
- Rij Ram Desad – harmonium and tabla-tarang

 

The first Beatle solo album -- as well as the first Apple album -- was a minor eruption of the pent-up energies of George Harrison, who was busy composing this offbeat score to the film Wonderwall as Magical Mystery Tour raced up the charts. With the subcontinental influence now firmly in the driver's seat, the score is mostly given over to the solemn, atmospheric drones of Indian music. Yet, as a whole, it's a fascinating if musically slender mishmash of sounds from East and West, everything casually juxtaposed or superimposed without a care in the world. Harrison himself does not appear as a player or singer; rather, he presides over the groups of Indian and British musicians, with half of the cues recorded in London, the other half in Bombay. The Indian tracks are professionally executed selections cut into film cue-sized bites, sometimes mixed up with a rock beat, never permitted to develop much. Touches of Harrison's whimsical side can be heard in the jaunty, honky tonk, tack piano-dominated "Drilling a Home" and happy-trails lope of "Cowboy Museum," as well as a title like "Wonderwall to Be Here." Occasionally, the overt footsteps of a Beatle can be heard: "Party Secombe" is a medium-tempo rock track that should remind the connoisseur of "Flying"; "Dream Scene" has Indian vocals moving back and forth between the loudspeakers over backwards electronic loops. As this and Harrison's second experimental release, Electronic Sound, undoubtedly proved, pigeonholing this Beatle was a dangerous thing. ---Richard S. Ginell, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) George Harrison Wed, 09 Jun 2010 21:39:45 +0000