Rock, Metal The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1642.html Sun, 25 Sep 2022 04:59:01 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Tim Buckley – Blue Afternoon (1969) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1642-tim-buckley/5494-tim-buckley-blue-afternoon-1969.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1642-tim-buckley/5494-tim-buckley-blue-afternoon-1969.html Tim Buckley – Blue Afternoon (1969)

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01. Happy Time – 3:13
02. Chase The Blues Away – 5:11
03. I Must Have Been Blind – 3:43
04. The River – 5:45
05. So Lonely – 3:27
06. Cafe – 5:25
07. Blue Melody – 4:54
08. The Train – 7:53

Personnel:
- Tim Buckley – 12-string guitar, vocals
- John Balkin - bass
- Lee Underwood – guitar, piano
- David Friedman – percussion
- John Miller – acoustic & electric bass
- Jimmy Madison – drums
- Carter C.C. Collins - conductor, congas on 07

 

Blue Afternoon was Tim Buckley's first self-produced record and his debut for Herb Cohen and Frank Zappa's Straight label. Buckley's first two albums were very much of their time and place, with their psychedelically tinged folk-rock compositions; naïve, romantic lyrical content; and moments of earnest protest. The introduction of acoustic bass and vibes into the arrangements on Happy Sad signaled a change in direction, however, and Blue Afternoon displayed similar jazz tendencies, using the same group of musicians plus drummer Jimmy Madison. Several tracks on Blue Afternoon are songs Buckley had intended to record on earlier albums but had not completed. The brooding "Chase the Blues Away" and the lighter, more upbeat "Happy Time," for instance, are numbers he had worked on in the summer of 1968 for possible inclusion on Happy Sad. (Demos can be heard on Rhino's Works in Progress album.) Here, as he did on Happy Sad, Buckley takes the folk song as his starting point and expands it, drawing on jazz influences to create new dynamics and to emphasize atmosphere and mood. This approach can be best appreciated on the mournful "The River," as simple acoustic guitar, cymbals, and vibes build a fluid, ebbing, and flowing arrangement around Buckley's beautiful, melancholy vocals. The period between 1968 and 1970 was an intensely creative one for Tim Buckley. Remarkably, during the same four weeks in which he recorded Blue Afternoon, he also recorded its follow-up, Lorca, and material for Starsailor. It's not surprising, then, that Blue Afternoon hints at Buckley's subsequent musical direction. While not in the experimental, avant-garde vein of the more challenging material on those next two albums, "The Train" foregrounds Lee Underwood's quietly intense, jazzy guitar and Buckley's vocal prowess, prefiguring the feeling of tracks like Lorca's "Nobody Walkin'" and Starsailor's "Monterey." ---Wilson Neate, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Tim Buckley Sat, 26 Jun 2010 09:48:28 +0000
Tim Buckley – Goodbye and Hello (1967) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1642-tim-buckley/5491-tim-buckley-goodbye-and-hello-1967.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1642-tim-buckley/5491-tim-buckley-goodbye-and-hello-1967.html Tim Buckley – Goodbye and Hello (1967)

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01. No Man Can Find the War (Larry Beckett, Buckley) – 2:56
02. Carnival Song – 3:07
03. Pleasant Street – 5:13
04. Hallucinations (Beckett, Buckley) – 4:51
05. I Never Asked To Be Your Mountain – 5:58
06. Once I Was – 3:20
07. Phantasmagoria In Two – 3:25
08. Knight-Errant (Beckett, Buckley) – 1:57
09. Goodbye And Hello (Beckett, Buckley) – 8:37
10. Morning Glory (Beckett, Buckley) – 2:48

Personnel:
- Tim Buckley – Guitar, Vocals
- Lee Underwood – Guitar, Keyboards
- John Farsha – Guitar
- Brian Hartzler – Guitar
- Jim Fielder, Jimmy Bond – Bass
- Don Randi, Jerry Yester – Keyboards
- Carter Collins – Congas, Percussion
- Dave Guard, Eddie Hoh – Percussion
- Henry Diltz – Harmonica on Once I Was

 

Often cited as the ultimate Tim Buckley statement, Goodbye and Hello is indeed a fabulous album, but it's merely one side of Tim Buckley's enormous talent. Recorded in the middle of 1967 (in the afterglow of Sgt. Pepper), this album is clearly inspired by Pepper's exploratory spirit. More often than not, this helps to bring Buckley's awesome musical vision home, but occasionally falters. Not that the album is overrated (it's not), it's just that it is only one side of Buckley. The finest songs on the album were written by him alone, particularly "Once I Was" and "Pleasant Street." Buoyed by Jerry Yester's excellent production, these tracks are easily among the finest example of Buckley's psychedelic/folk vision. A few tracks, namely the title cut and "No Man Can Find the War," were co-written by poet Larry Beckett. While Beckett's lyrics are undoubtedly literate and evocative, they occasionally tend to be too heavy-handed for Buckley. However, this is a minor criticism of an excellent and revolutionary album that was a quantum leap for both Tim Buckley and the audience. ---Matthew Greenwald, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Tim Buckley Fri, 25 Jun 2010 20:39:13 +0000
Tim Buckley – Greetings From L.A. (1972) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1642-tim-buckley/5504-tim-buckley-greetings-from-la-1972.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1642-tim-buckley/5504-tim-buckley-greetings-from-la-1972.html Tim Buckley – Greetings From L.A. (1972)

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01. Move With Me – 4:49
02. Get On Top – 6:30
03. Sweet Surrender – 6:43
04. Nighthawkin' (Buckley/Larry Beckett) – 3:20
05. Devil Eyes – 6:49
06. Hong Kong Bar – 7:08
07. Make It Right – 4:06

Personnel:
- Tim Buckley – guitars, vocals
- Lee Underwood – guitar, Keyboards
- Venetta Fields, Clydie King, Lorna Willard – vocals
- Joe Falsia – guitar, string arrangements
- Reinhold Press, Chuck Rainey – bass
- Harry Hyams, Ralph Schaeffer – viola
- Louis Kievman, William Kurash – violin
- Robert Konrad – violin, 12-string guitar
- Jesse Ehrlich – cello
- Kevin Kelly – organ, piano
- Paul Norros, Eugene Siegel – saxophone
- Jerry Goldstein – percussion, arranger, producer
- Carter Collins – conga, conductor
- Ed Greene – drums

 

Stepping back from the swooping avant-garde touches of Starsailor for a fairly greasy, funky, honky tonk set of songs, the opening lines of Greetings from L.A. set the tone: "I went down to the meat rack tavern/And I found myself a big ol' healthy girl." Sassy backing vocalists, honking sax, and more add to the atmosphere, while Tim Buckley himself blends his vocal acrobatics with touches not unfamiliar to fans of Mick Jagger or Jim Morrison. The studio band backing him up might not be the equal to, say, War, but in their own way they do the business; extra touches like the string arrangement on "Sweet Surrender" help all the more. The argument that this was all somehow a compromise or sellout doesn't seem to entirely wash. While no doubt there were commercial pressures at play, given Buckley's constant change from album to album it seems like he simply found something else to try, which he did with gusto. "Get On Top," one of his best numbers, certainly doesn't sound like something aimed for the charts. The music may have a solid groove to it (Kevin Kelly's organ is worth a mention), but Buckley's frank lyrics and improv scatting both show it as him following his own muse. ---Ned Raggett, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Tim Buckley Sat, 26 Jun 2010 19:41:09 +0000
Tim Buckley – Look At The Fool (1974) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1642-tim-buckley/5538-tim-buckley-look-at-the-fool-1974.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1642-tim-buckley/5538-tim-buckley-look-at-the-fool-1974.html Tim Buckley – Look At The Fool (1974)

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01. Look At The Fool – 5:10
02. Bring It On Up – 3:25
03. Helpless – 3:18
04. Freeway Blues – 3:10
05. Tijuana Moon – 2:38
06. Ain't It Peculiar – 3:34
07. Who Could Deny You – 4:20
08. Mexicali Voodoo – 2:23
09. Down In The Street – 3:20
10. Wanda Lu – 2:37

Personnel:
- Tim Buckley – 12-string guitar, vocals
- Joe Falsia – guitars, bass
- Mike Melvoin – piano, organ, moog synthesizer
- Jim Fielder, Chuck Rainey, Jim Hughart – bass
- Earl Palmer – drums
- Mark Tiernan – electric piano
- King Errison – congas
- Jesse Erlich – cello
- David Bluefield – clavinet
- Gary Coleman – percussion
- Venetta Fields, Clydie King, Sherlie Matthews – Background Vocals
- Anthony Terran, William Peterson, Terry Harrington, Richard Nash,
Johnny Rotella - horn section

 

Tim Buckley's final album is a sad, burned-out affair, suffering from weak, poorly conceived material and washed-out soul-rock arrangements. Most troublingly, Buckley's voice -- the one asset he could always count on -- had itself begun to deteriorate. Here his vocals were distressingly thin, like torn socks that have gone through the laundry cycle one too many times. ---Richie Unterberger, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Tim Buckley Mon, 28 Jun 2010 15:05:45 +0000
Tim Buckley – Lorca (1970) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1642-tim-buckley/5497-tim-buckley-lorca-1970.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1642-tim-buckley/5497-tim-buckley-lorca-1970.html Tim Buckley – Lorca (1970)

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01. Lorca - 9:54
02. Anonymous Proposition - 7:44
03. I Had A Talk With My Woman - 5:56
04. Driftin' - 8:07
05. Nobody Walkin' - 7:35

Personnel:
- Tim Buckley - 12-string guitar, vocal
- John Balkin - upright bass, fender bass, pipe organ
- Lee Underwood - electric guitar, electric piano
- Carter C.C. Collins – congas

 

Buckley stunned and, to a rare degree, alienated fans with the dissonant, at times wearying, avant-garde exercises in vocal gymnastics that took up the entire first side of this LP. Side two was far more accessible, though Buckley's fusion of folk instrumentation with jazzy improvisation on extended compositions continued to take him further away from his folk-rock roots. ---Richie Unterberger, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Tim Buckley Sat, 26 Jun 2010 12:32:39 +0000
Tim Buckley – Sefronia (1973) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1642-tim-buckley/5508-tim-buckley-sefronia-1973.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1642-tim-buckley/5508-tim-buckley-sefronia-1973.html Tim Buckley – Sefronia (1973)

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01. Dolphins (Fred Neil) – 3:10
02. Honey Man (Beckett, Buckley) – 4:10
03. Because Of You (Beckett, Buckley) – 4:26
04. Peanut Man (Freeman, Nehls) – 2:52
05. Martha (Tom Waits) – 3:15
06. Quicksand (Buckley) – 3:23
07. I Know I'd Recognize Your Face (Baron, Randell) – 3:58
08. Stone In Love (Buckley) – 3:27
09. Sefronia: After Asklepiades, After Kafka (Beckett, Buckley) – 3:11
10. Sefronia: The King's Chain (Beckett, Buckley) – 2:27
11. Sally, Go 'Round The Roses (Buckley) – 3:41

Personnel:
- Tim Buckley – 12-string guitar, vocals
- Lee Underwood, Joe Falsia, Bob Rafkin – guitar
- Bernie Mysior, Reinie Press – bass
- Mark Tiernan – keyboards
- Denny Randell – keyboards, producer, arrangements
- Tom Scott – saxophone
- Fred Seldon – flute
- Larry Bunker – percussion
- King Errisson – percussion, congas, tambourine
- Ken Watson – percussion, timpani
- Buddy Helm – drums
- Marcia Waldorf, Sharon Beard, Myrna Matthews,
Lisa Roberts – background vocals

 

Tim Buckley went deeper into white funk on Sefronia, despite two problems: white funk was not the forte of these L.A. session musicians and female backup vocalists, and not the style for which Buckley himself had the greatest empathy. His voice isn't as stunning as usual on his next-to-last album, but the bigger problem is the material, which is usually forced and pedestrian. Glimmers of quality can be heard on his cover of Fred Neil's "The Dolphins," and the strange two-part title track, which is a throwback to his more ambitious vocal workouts of times past. ---Richie Unterberger, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Tim Buckley Sat, 26 Jun 2010 21:44:54 +0000
Tim Buckley – Starsailor (1970) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1642-tim-buckley/5502-tim-buckley-starsailor-1970.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1642-tim-buckley/5502-tim-buckley-starsailor-1970.html Tim Buckley – Starsailor (1970)

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01. Come Here Woman (Tim Buckley) – 4:10
02. I Woke Up (Larry Beckett, Tim Buckley) – 4:02
03. Monterey (Larry Beckett, Tim Buckley) – 4:29
04. Moulin Rouge (Larry Beckett, Tim Buckley) – 1:56
05. Song To The Siren (Tim Buckley) – 3:24
06. Jungle Fire (Tim Buckley) – 4:38
07. Starsailor (Larry Beckett, Tim Buckley, John Balkin) – 4:33
08. The Healing Festival (Tim Buckley) – 3:13
09. Down By The Borderline (Tim Buckley) – 5:15

Personnel:
- Tim Buckley – 12-string guitar, vocals
- Lee Underwood – electric guitar, electric piano, pipe organ
- John Balkin – string bass, electric bass
- Buzz Gardner – trumpet, flugelhorn
- Bunk Gardner - alto flute, tenor sax
- Maury Baker – tympani, traps

 

After his beginnings as a gentle, melodic baroque folk-rocker, Buckley gradually evolved into a downright experimental singer/songwriter who explored both jazz and avant-garde territory. Starsailor is the culmination of his experimentation and alienated far more listeners than it exhilarated upon its release in 1970. Buckley had already begun to delve into jazz fusion on late-'60s records like Happy Sad, and explored some fairly "out" acrobatic, quasi-operatic vocals on his final Elektra LP, Lorca. With former Mother of Invention Bunk Gardner augmenting Buckley's group on sax and alto flute, Buckley applies vocal gymnastics to a set of material that's as avant-garde in its songwriting as its execution. At his most anguished (which is often on this album), he sounds as if his liver is being torn out -- slowly. Almost as if to prove he can still deliver a mellow buzz, he throws in a couple of pleasant jazz-pop cuts, including the odd, jaunty French tune "Moulin Rouge." Surrealistic lyrics, heavy on landscape imagery like rivers, skies, suns, and jungle fires, top off a record that isn't for everybody, or even for every Buckley fan, but endures as one of the most uncompromising statements ever made by a singer/songwriter. ---Richie Unterberger, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Tim Buckley Sat, 26 Jun 2010 17:28:13 +0000