Rock, Metal The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1964.html Sun, 25 Sep 2022 12:38:03 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Jethro Tull - Live at Montreux 2003 http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1964-jethro-tull/19310-jethro-tull-live-at-montreux-2003.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1964-jethro-tull/19310-jethro-tull-live-at-montreux-2003.html Jethro Tull - Live at Montreux 2003

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01. Some Day The Sun Won't Shine For You
02. Life Is A Long Song
03. Bouree (version de Noel)
04. With You There To Help Me
05. Pavane
06. Empty Cafe
07. Hunting Girl
08. Eurology
09. Dot Com
10. God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen
11. Fat Man
12. Living In The Past
13. Nothing Is Easy
14. Beside Myself
15. My God
16. Budapest
17. New Jig
18. Aqualung
19. Locomotive Breath

Ian Anderson - harmonica, flute, guitar, vocals
Martin Barre - guitar
Andy Giddings - keyboards
Jonathan Noyce - bass
Doane Perry – drums

 

While the world may not need another live Jethro Tull disc recorded only two years after their last one, this sturdy, nearly two-hour 2003 gig, released simultaneously on DVD and CD (same tunes and order, but Ian Anderson's often clunky introductions are mercifully edited out of the audio-only version), finds the band in fine form. Anderson and guitarist Martin Barre, the two flagship members, effectively juggle the set to include a few new tracks and some rarities with the handful of hits ("Aqualung," "Locomotive Breath," "My God," "Living in the Past") that the fans demand out of every gig. The double disc is broken down by the band's two sets, the first being primarily acoustic-based, or at least softer material, and the second revving up the electricity and intensity. The other three members (bass, drums, and keys) are accomplished musicians who play with precision if maybe a shortage of personality. But it's really Anderson's and to a lesser extent Barre's show, and they jubilantly lead the ensemble through the blues, prog, jazz, and classical influences that have always distinguished Tull from their contemporaries. Highlights include an acoustic "Fat Man" with Barre playing flute along with Anderson, a stunning 11-minute "Budapest" from Crest of a Knave, and the exotic Middle Eastern worldbeat of "Dot Com." The sound is perfectly recorded and Anderson is in good spirits as he dips deep into the Tull catalog to dust off oldies such as "Some Day the Sun Won't Shine for You" (from the group's 1968 debut), Stand Up's "Nothing Is Easy," and Benefit's "With You There to Help Me." The band injects a twist into the hoary "Locomotive Breath" as it veers off into old British folk territory in its final two minutes, and even "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen" (from The Jethro Tull Christmas Album) gets a new lease on life, albeit in a slightly cheesy jazz-classical arrangement reminiscent of "Bourée." Still, this is an impressive document of a band embracing its past while pushing into fresh territory nearly four decades into its existence. Maintaining the old fan base while doing this is a tricky balancing act, but one that Anderson and Barre perform with grace and class. ---Hal Horowitz, allmusic.com

 

Już jakiś czas temu napisałem, że Jethro Tull próbuje pobić rekord Deep Purple w ilości wydanych koncertówek... Live At The Montreux 2003 to kolejna. I kolejna dobra – zaznaczę od razu, choć jako miłośnik zespołu wolałbym, aby formacja częściej zaglądała do studia nagraniowego. Wolałbym też, aby albumy live w pełni odzwierciedlały to, co grupa podczas konkretnego występu wykonała, żeby oprócz pewniaków były jakieś ciekawostki – np. podczas przedstawionego tu koncertu w Montreux zespół wykonał jeszcze kilka kompozycji, w tym wiązankę składającą się m.in. z utworów Songs From The Wood i Too Old To Rock’n’Roll, których tutaj nie uświadczymy... Poza tym: znaczną część z granych w tamtym okresie utworów Anderson przedstawił niedawno w wersjach orkiestrowych na płycie Ian Anderson Plays The Orchestral Jethro Tull, a zatem ten sam materiał trafia na rynek raz po raz, co może przyprawić o przesyt, tym bardziej, że Live At The Montreux 2003 ukaże się także w wersji DVD.

Trudno napisać coś oryginalnego o tym dwupłytowym wydawnictwie. Wiadomo, że dyspozycja Jethro Tull zależy od dyspozycji lidera, Iana Andersona, a ten utrzymuje stałą, wysoką formę. Klasyczne utwory grupy w rodzaju Living In The Past czy ozdobionego długą introdukcją Locomotive Breath prezentują się jak zwykle bardzo solidnie (może tylko Aqualung został wykonany trochęzbyt rzemieślniczo). Rozbudowana forma kompozycji jak zwykle bardzo zespołowi służy. Budapest w ponadjedenastominutowej wersji tradycyjnie stanowi okazję do tego, aby muzycy mogli sobie poimprowizować. Some Day The Sun Won’t Shine For You pokazuje, że członkowie zespołu wciąż czują bluesa, z kolei ozdobione żeńską wokalizą Dot Com przekonuje, że najlepsze dokonania grupy wcale nie muszą pochodzić sprzed trzech dekad. I tu dotykamy sedna sprawy: każde wydawnictwo Jethro Tull pozwala zasmakować magii, jaka cechuje muzykę tej grupy. Ten jedyny na świecie głos Andersona, jego gra na flecie – to wciąż coś niesamowitego. Mimo więc pewnych zastrzeżeń – dotyczących raczej taktyki edytorskiej, niż kondycji wykonawczej – zestaw ten jest godny polecenia. ---Pawel Brzykcy, terazrock.pl

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Jethro Tull Sun, 28 Feb 2016 17:11:19 +0000
Jethro Tull - Live in Santa Monica (1979) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1964-jethro-tull/15708-jethro-tull-live-in-santa-monica-1979.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1964-jethro-tull/15708-jethro-tull-live-in-santa-monica-1979.html Jethro Tull - Live in Santa Monica (1979)

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Disc 1:
01 Intro
02 Dark Ages
03 Home
04 Orion
05 Wond'Ring Aloud
06 Dun Ringill
07 Elegy
08 Something's On The Move
09 Aqualung
10 King Henry's Madrigal
11 Heavy Horses
12 One Brown Mouse

Disc 2:
01 Songs From The Wood
02 Band Introductions > Jams O'Donnell's Jigs
03 Thick As A Brick
04 Cross-Eyed Mary
05 Minstrel In The Gallery
06 Locomotive Breath

Ian Anderson: flute, guitars, vocals
Martin Barre: guitars
Barriemore Barlow: drums
John Evan: keyboards, bass
David Palmer: keyboars

 

Jethro Tull's unique sound featuring Ian Anderson and his magic flute live at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, California. This show from the 16th of November was a broadcast by KMET-FM and though the sound isn't very good still deserves a listen.

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Jethro Tull Sat, 15 Mar 2014 16:43:34 +0000
Jethro Tull - Too Old To Rock 'n' Roll: Too Young To Die! (1976) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1964-jethro-tull/16974-jethro-tull-too-old-to-rock-n-roll-too-young-to-die-1976.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1964-jethro-tull/16974-jethro-tull-too-old-to-rock-n-roll-too-young-to-die-1976.html Jethro Tull - Too Old To Rock 'n' Roll: Too Young To Die! (1976)

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01. "Quiz Kid"
02. "Crazed Institution"
03. "Salamander"
04. "Taxi Grab"
05. "From A Dead Beat To An Old Greaser"
06. "Bad-Eyed And Loveless"
07. "Big Dipper"
08. "Too Old To Rock 'n' Roll: Too Young To Die"
09. "Pied Piper"
10. "The Chequered Flag (Dead Or Alive)"
11. "A Small Cigar [Bonus Track]"
12. "Strip Cartoon [Bonus Track]"

    Ian Anderson – vocals, acoustic guitar, flute, harmonica, occasional electric guitar and percussion
    Martin Barre – electric guitar
    John Evan – pianos, keyboards
    Barriemore Barlow – drums, percussion
    John Glascock – bass guitar, vocals
+
    David Palmer – saxophone on track 5, piano on track 11
    Maddy Prior – backing vocals on track 8
    Angela Allen – backing vocals on tracks 2 & 7

 

Jethro Tull's Too Old to Rock 'N' Roll: Too Young to Die! remains one of the minor efforts in its catalog. Though the group was never a critical favorite, this 1976 album was particularly dismissed, and it didn't find as much favor as usual from fans, either. At the time this reissue was released, 26 years after the original LP, it remained the group's only release of the 1970s not to have at least gone gold in the U.S. In his liner notes to the reissue, bandleader Ian Anderson claims that the collection was intended to support a stage musical "based on a late-'50s motor cycle rocker and his living-in-the-past nostalgia for youthful years. Not me, guv, honest," he added. "Why do people always think it has to be autobiographical?" Perhaps because the main character, Ray Lomas, bears a striking resemblance to Anderson in the cartoon strip included with the album and because the sentiments expressed in the songs revealed a curmudgeonly attitude familiar from past Jethro Tull efforts penned by Anderson. The songs don't conform to the story line developed in the strip, nor do they tell a coherent story on their own, though they do have their own separate stories to tell. For example, "Crazed Institution," in the strip, has something to do with Lomas' revulsion at a department store called "Horrids" (i.e., Harrod's), but the song sounds like a putdown of glam rockers who "live and die upon [their] cross of platinum." The title track, which went on to become a classic rock and concert favorite, remains the most striking tune. This reissue adds two previously released outtakes, "Strip Cartoon," which appeared as a non-LP B-side in 1977, and "A Small Cigar," making its U.S. debut after a 1994 appearance on the U.K. compilation Nightcap: The Unreleased Masters 1973-1991. ---William Ruhlmann, allmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Jethro Tull Sat, 06 Dec 2014 16:26:55 +0000
Jethro Tull – Aqualung Live [2005] http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1964-jethro-tull/7044-jethro-tull-aqualung-live-2005.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1964-jethro-tull/7044-jethro-tull-aqualung-live-2005.html Jethro Tull – Aqualung Live [2005]

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01. Aqualung
02. Crosseyed Mary
03. Cheap Day Return
04. Mother Goose
05. Wond’ring Aloud                play
06. Up to Me
07. My God – Jethro Tull, Anderson, Ian
08. Hymn 43
09. Slipstream
10. Locomotive Breath
11. Wind-Up
12. Riffs — Another Monkey
13. Recording the Original
14. Choosing My Words with Care    play
15. Hummmmmm 43
16. A Different Kettle of Very Different Fish
17. But Is It Any Good?

* Ian Anderson – flute, vocals, acoustic guitar
* Martin Barre – electric guitar
* Doane Perry – drums, percussion
* Andrew Giddings – piano, organ, keyboards
* Jonathan Noyce – bass guitar

 

Each era of rock music has had its own craftily marketed phenomenon -- it was the "live album" in the '70s, "unplugged" recordings in the '90s, and since the late '80s through the present day, the "tribute album." But the early 21st century saw another addition -- veteran bands revisiting classic albums and performing them in their entirety. Jethro Tull's most enduring release is largely agreed to be 1971's classic Aqualung, and in late 2004 Ian Anderson, Martin Barre, and their latest Tull mates dusted off the album once more in front of a small audience for XM Radio's Then Again Live series. Since 33 years had passed between the original and the re-reading, the performances on Aqualung Live are slightly more restrained. And while some of Barre's mighty riffs can still be spotted blaring away -- most notably the middle bit of "My God" -- other songs get an overhauling, such as the barely recognizable "Hymn 43." In addition to revisiting the full album, several interview segments are tacked on at the end of the disc, including some interesting bits about the original recording (it turns out that Led Zeppelin were also recording nearby) and the fact that, despite popular belief, Aqualung was not a concept album. Aqualung Live proves that Anderson and Barre are still at the top of their game, unlike some other "classic rock" acts whose playing abilities have diminished over the years. [Aqualung Live was distributed at shows for free during Tull's U.S. tour in the fall of 2005. Subsequently, it was made available as a special limited-edition release, with all artist and publishing royalties going to charities for the homeless.] ---Greg Prato, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Jethro Tull Wed, 06 Oct 2010 11:16:18 +0000
Jethro Tull – Christmas Album (2003) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1964-jethro-tull/7718-jethro-tull-christmas-album-2003.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1964-jethro-tull/7718-jethro-tull-christmas-album-2003.html Jethro Tull – Christmas Album (2003)

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1. Birthday Card at Christmas
2. Holly Herald
3. Christmas Song, A
4. Another Christmas Song
5. God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen
6. Jack Frost and the Hooded Crow
7. Last Man at the Party
8. Weathercock
9. Pavane
10. First Snow on Brooklyn
11. Greensleeved play
12. Fire at Midnight play
13. We Five Kings
14. Ring Out Solstice Bells
15. Bouree
16. Winter Snowscape, A - (bonus track)

Personnel:
Ian Anderson (vocals, acoustic guitar, mandolin, flute, piccolo, percussion);
Martin Barre (guitar, acoustic guitar, electric guitar);
Dave Pegg (mandolin);
Gábor Csonka, Péter Szilágyi (violin);
Gyula Benkö (viola);
András Sturcz (cello);
Andy Giddings (accordion, organ, keyboards, keyboard bass);
Doane Perry (drums, percussion);
James Duncan (drums).

 

For a band that remained relatively consistent (with a few minor exceptions) in their approach to rock & roll since 1968, Jethro Tull also possessed a sound that was uniquely '70s-oriented during their most successful period between 1971-1978. Avid fans have been yearning for the group's return to the style which made them one of the most successful of the guitar-based, mainstream prog outfits -- albums like Broadsword and the Beast and J-Tull.Com touched on their former glory, but they didn't fully satisfy. Christmas Album could be the recording that those fans have been waiting for, and they shouldn't let its title or overt seasonal orientation dissuade them -- with their liberal use of classic English folk music and overall orientation toward England's past (even in their name), Jethro Tull is also the one prog rock/hard rock band of their generation that could issue a Christmas album that folds so easily into the rest of their output; it transcends its purpose and focus, mostly through the quiet boldness of its music and playing and the surprising excitement that laces most of the 16 songs. With a mixture of re-recorded old songs, Christmas standards and new originals, songwriter/singer Ian Anderson, in a roundabout manner, captures the tradition, warmth, and bittersweet feelings that are inextricably linked to the holiday season; at the same time, Anderson, longtime collaborator/lead guitarist Martin Barre, and the rest of the group's 2003 lineup recapture the musical intensity of three decades' past, and build on the classic Tull mood of sardonic humor, wry irony, and fierce passions that permeated all of their work from Stand Up to Songs From the Wood.

All of this material, in its content and execution, recalls the group's prime early-'70s years and levels of musical complexity not presented so successfully by this band in at least 25 years. With a generous use of unamplified instruments like mandolin, acoustic guitar, flute, and accordion, this album resembles the production found on Songs From the Wood and Heavy Horses. In fact, three tracks from those two albums were reworked for this release; "Fire at Midnight," "Ring Out Solstice Bells" and "Weathercock." Only "Ring Out Solstice Bells" appeared to be the obvious choice for a Christmas album, but given Anderson's offbeat perspective of things, the other two tracks assimilate nicely. In addition, "Jack Frost and the Hooded Crow" sounds like it could have emanated from those 1977 and 1978 recordings, as could "Last Man at the Party" from 1974's War Child sessions. Among the re-recordings, pieces such as "A Christmas Song," that originally had orchestral accompaniment, are redone without it, in new arrangements, while others that were done without orchestra get dressed up with strings. From the traditional side of Christmas, Tull gives "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen" a jazzy adaptation reminiscent of "Bouree" from Stand Up (which is also revisited on this recording) and "We Five Kings”.

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Jethro Tull Sun, 19 Dec 2010 15:31:55 +0000
Jethro Tull – National Concert Hall (2011) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1964-jethro-tull/9207-jethro-tull-national-concert-hall-2011.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/en/rock/1964-jethro-tull/9207-jethro-tull-national-concert-hall-2011.html Jethro Tull – National Concert Hall (2011)

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1.Living In The Past 
2.Nothing Is Easy 
3.Life’s A Long Song 
4.Up To Me 			play
5.Beggar’s Farm 		play
6.New Day Yesterday 
7.Thick As A Brick 
8.Bouree 
9.Mother Goose 
10.Pastimes With Good Company 
11.A Change Of Horses 
12.My God 
13.Budapest 
14.Aqualung 
15.Locomotive Breath

Personnel:
- Ian Anderson / flute, acoustic guitar, harmonica, vocals
- Martin Barre / guitar
- Doane Perry / drums and percussion
- John O'Hara / keyboards, accordion
- David Goodier / bass
+ National Quartet

The National Concert Hall
Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2
Irlandia, March 18, 2011.

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Jethro Tull Sun, 22 May 2011 18:29:04 +0000