Blues The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/5515.html Sun, 28 Nov 2021 01:01:44 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management pl-pl Rural Blues Vol. 2 (1951-1962) (1998) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/5515-rural-blues/20571-rural-blues-vol-2-1951-1962-1998.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/5515-rural-blues/20571-rural-blues-vol-2-1951-1962-1998.html Rural Blues Vol. 2 (1951-1962) (1998)

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01. Sam 'Suitcase' Johnson - Sam's Comin' Home (2:46)
02. Sam 'Suitcase' Johnson - Sam's Boogie (2:25)
03. Bobo Thomas - Catfish Blues (I Wish I Was A Catfish) (2:57)
04. Clifford Gibson - Sneaky Groundhog (3:02)
05. Clifford Gibson - Let Me Be Your Handy Man (3:02)
06. Juke Boy Bonner - Rock With Me Baby (2:54)
07. Juke Boy Bonner - Well Baby (2:28)
08. Joel Hopkins - Good Times Here, Better Down The Road (3:13)
09. Joel Hopkins - Thunder In Germany (8:15)
10. Joel Hopkins - I Ain't Gonna Roll For The Big Hat Man No More (5:42)
11. Joel Hopkins - Accused Me Of Forgin', Can't Even Write My Name (5:16)
12. Joel Hopkins - Matchbox Blues (1:54)
13. Jewell Long - Frankie And Albert (3:23)
14. Jewell Long - My Pony Run Blues (2:51)
15. Jewell Long - Sealy Rag (2:17)
16. Jewell Long - Muddy Shoes Blues (3:27)
17. Clifford Gibson - It's Best To Know Who You're Talking To (3:10)
18. Clifford Gibson - I Don't Want No Woman (3:15)
19. Clifford Gibson - The Monkey Likes To Boogie (2:30)
20. Clifford Gibson - No Success Blues (2:56)
21. Arthur 'Big Boy' Crudup - Angel Child (Take 2) (5:25)

 

The rural blues developed in three principal regions, Georgia and the Carolinas, Texas, and Mississippi. The blues of Georgia and the Carolinas is noted for its clarity of enunciation and regularity of rhythm. Influenced by ragtime and white folk music, it is more melodic than the Texas and Mississippi styles. Blind Willie McTell and Blind Boy Fuller were representative of this style. The Texas blues is characterized by high, clear singing accompanied by supple guitar lines that consist typically of single-string picked arpeggios rather than strummed chords. Blind Lemon Jefferson was by far the most influential Texas bluesman. Mississippi Delta blues is the most intense of the three styles and has been the most influential. Vocally, it is the most speech-like, and the guitar accompaniment is rhythmic and percussive; a slide or bottleneck is often used. The Mississippi style is represented by Charley Patton, Eddie (“Son”) House, and Robert Johnson, among others.

The first blues recordings were made in the 1920s by black women such as Mamie Smith, Ma Rainey, Ida Cox, and Bessie Smith. These performers were primarily stage singers backed by jazz bands; their style is known as classic blues.

The Great Depression and the World Wars caused the geographic dispersal of the blues as millions of blacks left the South for the cities of the North. The blues became adapted to the more sophisticated urban environment. Lyrics took up urban themes, and the blues ensemble developed as the solo bluesman was joined by a pianist or harmonica player and then by a rhythm section consisting of bass and drums. The electric guitar and the amplified harmonica created a driving sound of great rhythmic and emotional intensity. ---britannica.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Rural Blues Thu, 27 Oct 2016 14:29:45 +0000
Rural Blues Vol.1 (1934-1956) http://theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/5515-rural-blues/20551-rural-blues-vol1-1934-1956.html http://theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/5515-rural-blues/20551-rural-blues-vol1-1934-1956.html Rural Blues Vol.1 (1934-1956)

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01. Up and Down Building K.C. Line - Willie Lane [00:02:57]
02. Prowlin' Ground Hog - Willie Lane [00:02:44]
03. Too Many Women Blues - Willie Lane [00:02:26]
04. Howlin' Wolf - Willie Lane [00:02:47]
05. Black Cat Rag - Willie Lane [00:02:39]
06. Black Cat Rag [Alternate Take] - Willie Lane [00:03:00]
07. T.P. Railer - Black Diamond [00:02:44]
08. Lonesome Blues - Black Diamond [00:02:32]
09. All My Money Is Gone - Goldrush [00:02:48]
10. Move It on Over - Monfoe Moe Jackson [00:02:40]
11. Go 'Way from My Door - Monfoe Moe Jackson [00:03:01]
12. Locked in Jail Blues - Johnny Beck (the blind boy) [00:02:28]
13. You've Gotta Lay Down Mama - Johnny Beck (the blind boy) [00:02:38]
14. Baby Blues - John Lee [00:03:26]
15. Baby Please Don't Go - John Lee [00:03:05]
16. Down at the Depot - John Lee [00:03:06]
17. Alabama Boogie - John Lee [00:02:46]
18. Blind's Blues - John Lee [00:02:15]
19. Mississippi Boogie - Julius King [00:03:10]
20. One O'Clock Boogie - Julius King [00:03:00]
21. If You See Me Lover - Julius King [00:03:06]
22. I Want a Slice of Your Pudding - Julius King [00:03:03]
23. Lonesome Old Jail - D. A. Hunt [00:03:00]
24. Greyhound Blues - D. A. Hunt [00:02:37]
25. My Baby Ooo - One String Sam [00:03:06]
26. I Need a Hundred Dollars - One String Sam [00:03:01]

 

Document's Rural Blues, Vol. 1 is a delightful collection of the complete recorded works of Willie Lane, Black Diamond, Goldrush, Monroe Moe Jackson, Johnny Beck, John Lee, Julius King, D.A. Hunt, and One String Sam, none of them exactly household names, drawn from rare and obscure 78s recorded between 1934 and 1956. That no one sticks around for more than a few tunes gives this collection a refreshing feel of variety and vitality, and Willie Lane and John Lee in particular prove to be real finds, both of them strong guitar players and able vocalists. Lee's take on the oft-covered "Baby Please Don't Go" is a gem, featuring the entirely unexpected accompaniment of a cane flute or whistle that gives the song a bright, surreal tone. The two selections from white country blues singer Monroe Moe Jackson, "Move It on Over" and "Go 'Way from My Door," are also revelations, as Jackson's jagged, gravel-packed voice hits places that would make Tom Waits jealous. It is interesting to note that the most recent recordings presented here, "My Baby Ooo" and "I Need a Hundred Dollars" by One String Sam, tracked in 1956, are the ones that sound the most ancient, with Sam's one string diddley bow giving both pieces an eerie, spooky resonance. This is a wonderful archival collection, and the rarity of the tracks it presents only makes it more valuable. ---Steve Leggett, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Rural Blues Sun, 23 Oct 2016 11:35:38 +0000