Blues The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/988.html Tue, 07 Dec 2021 19:21:49 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management pl-pl Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton - Newport Folk Festival 1969 http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/988-big-mama-thorntom/25281-willie-mae-qbig-mamaq-thornton-newport-folk-festival-1969.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/988-big-mama-thorntom/25281-willie-mae-qbig-mamaq-thornton-newport-folk-festival-1969.html Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton - Newport Folk Festival 1969

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01. (Intro) 0:39 
02. Mother In Law 4:04 
03. Rock Me Baby 5:08 
04. (Band Intros) 1:40
05. Ball And Chain 6:07 
06. Stage Banter 1:05 
07. Hound Dog 3:12 
08. Swing It On Home 7:19 

Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton - vocals, harmonica, drums
Samuel Lawhorn - guitar
Pinetop Perkins - piano
Curtis Tillman - bass 
Eddie Horton - drums

 

Bridging the gap between seminal originators like Bessie Smith and later-era blues divas like Koko Taylor, Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton enjoyed a long illustrious career spanning four decades. Blessed with a powerfully pure and melodious voice and an equally strong personality, Thornton would have a profound influence that stretched far beyond the blues community. A self-taught drummer, harmonica player, and songwriter, Thornton was that rare triple threat who could play, sing, and write, and whose talents became a magnet for many of the greatest blues musicians of the era. The likes of Muddy Waters and his band, Lightnin' Hopkins and Buddy Guy all served to enhance the music of Big Mama Thornton, both in the studio and on stage. Her recordings and the blues phraseology of her singing style, which could be strong and sexy one minute and unequivocally delicate the next, would inspire nearly everyone that encountered her music, including the greatest of her black contemporaries, like the aforementioned Muddy Waters and Lightnin' Hopkins to subsequent generations of white superstars like Elvis Presley and Janis Joplin.

Born in rural Alabama in 1926, Thornton's introduction to music began like many of her peers, in the Southern Baptist church, where her father was a minister and her mother a singer. Following her mother's death in 1941, the 14 year old began a seven-year tenure with Sammy Green's Georgia-based show, The Hot Harlem Revue. Often promoted as the "New Bessie Smith," Thornton sang her way throughout the southeastern United States, absorbing the influences of seminal blues singers like Smith, Ma Rainey, Memphis Minnie, and Junior Parker, while gaining valuable singing and stage experience.

In 1948, Thornton relocated to Houston, Texas. Three years later she began her recording career, signing with the Houston-based Peacock Records in 1951, a label specializing in gritty rhythm and blues and gospel recordings that would have a significant influence on soul and rock & roll music in the decades to follow. The following year (1952), Thornton joined label mate and bandleader Johnny Otis' traveling revue and played at New York City's famed Apollo Theatre, where she began as the opening act for R&B artists Esther Phillips and Mel Walker. Her undeniable charisma and vocal prowess soon had her advancing to headliner status and it was during this stint that she first earned the nickname "Big Mama."

At a Los Angeles recording session that August, Thornton first encountered the young songwriting team of Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, who encouraged her to record a new 12-bar blues vocal they had written, called "Hound Dog." The single, despite being laden with sexual references, double entendres, and exuberant whoops and barks (backed with Thornton's equally provocative original, "They Call Me Big Mama," on the B-side), became a smash hit the following year, selling nearly two million copies and topping the R&B charts. One of the most obvious and notorious examples of the financial inequity that often existed between black and white performers, Thornton would earn a lifetime total of a mere $500 for her recording, while Elvis Presley's version recorded three years later and revised for a mainstream audience, brought him international fame and considerably greater financial reward.

During the 1960s, Thornton relocated to San Francisco and remained a popular fixture on the club circuit and by the middle of the decade began a second resurgence. In 1966, Thornton recorded "Big Mama Thornton With The Muddy Waters Blues Band," which featured Sammy Lawhorn and Muddy Waters himself as her guitarists. Two years later, she would record the equally exciting Ball 'n' Chain album, this time with Lightnin' Hopkins serving as her guitar player. Both of these albums would have a profound influence, especially in San Francisco, where they would be embraced as strongly as those by Muddy Waters himself and the early Butterfield Blues Band, becoming part of the sonic blueprint for the San Francisco sound.

All of which makes this previously unheard Big Mama Thornton performance, recorded at the 1969 Newport Folk Festival so utterly compelling. Not only does this capture Thornton at a peak moment, but her band is comprised of an incredible roster of blues musicians, all notable for their contributions to the most important recordings ever to come out of Chicago's Chess Studios. Featuring guitarist Sammy Lawhorn (who never sounded better than he does right here!) and pianist Pinetop Perkins, not to mention the formidable rhythm section of Chess session men Curtis Tillman and Eddie Horton, this is a blazing performance that makes it abundantly clear just how incredible Thornton could be on stage.

The set kicks off with "Mother In Law," a nod to Junior Parker, one of Thornton's major influences. This bluesy shuffle features both vocal and harmonica performances by Thornton and superb fiery guitar work from Lawhorn, setting the stage for the fireworks to come. Thornton's harmonica stylings also launch the deep sway of "Rock Me Baby" to follow, which showcases the powerfully pure tone of her vocals. This also features excellent piano work from Perkins throughout and a guitar solo from Lawton that burns with so much intensity that Thornton spontaneously encourages him to extend the solo even further than usual. Following some humorous stage banter and Thornton's introduction of her musicians, they delve deep into the delicious slow blues of "Ball And Chain," which would become a signature cover for Janis Joplin that same year. Again, Lawton burns right off the bat, inspiring a highly-engaged vocal performance from Thornton. Perkins dances all over the piano and Lawton's guitar solo, which incorporates plenty of reverb, whammy bar tremolo, and a touch of wah-wah pedal, manages to psychedelically outshine nearly everything coming out of San Francisco at the time. This is a smoldering slow blues of the highest order that skillfully increases the intensity until the Newport audience is literally going nuts.

Following some more humorous stage banter that gives listeners a glimpse of Thornton's strong personality, in which she declares, "This is the record I made Elvis Presley rich on," Thornton and band kick into "Hound Dog." Considerably more gritty and arguably more compelling than Presley's take on the song, Thornton's version is an altogether more smoldering affair. Although distinctly blues-based, the roots of rock music are clearly embedded in her arrangement. With limited stage time due to the nature of the festival performance, the final song of the set is a bit of an anti-climactic listen, but nonetheless proves that Thornton and band could swing with the best of them. This extended romp through "Swing It On Home" starts out as a great example of the tight musical relationship of Thornton and these incredible musicians, with its sharp stops and starts during the verses and it's swinging abandon on the choruses. Midway, Thornton takes over on drums, and while her solo is sloppy and eventually dissolves completely, she is no doubt having a lot of fun on stage and the crowd responds in kind. With the audience howling to keep it going, the group does just that, vamping on the song for an additional four minutes while Thornton struts around the stage whipping the Newport audience into a frenzy. ---Alan Bershaw, wolfgangs.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Big Mama Thornton Thu, 16 May 2019 13:58:00 +0000
Big Mama Thornton - 30 Most Slow Blues (2017) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/988-big-mama-thorntom/24286-big-mama-thornton-30-most-slow-blues-2017.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/988-big-mama-thorntom/24286-big-mama-thornton-30-most-slow-blues-2017.html Big Mama Thornton - 30 Most Slow Blues (2017)

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01. Big Mama's Blues (My Love)
02. Hound Dog
03. I'm Feeling Alright
04. Rolling Stone (Muddy Waters)
05. Gonna Leave You
06. The Place
07. Mr. Cool
08. Big Mama's New Love
09. Everything Gonna Be Alright
10. Private Number
11. Sweet Little Angel
12. Big Mama Swings
13. Big Mama's Bumble Bee Blues
14. Sassy Mama
15. Your Love Is Where It Ought to Be 
16. Happy Me
17. Watermelon Man
18. Funky Broadway
19. School Boy
20. I Just Can't Help Myself
21. Looking the World Over
22. That Lucky Old Sun
23. I Feel the Way I Feel
24. Guide Me Home
25. Session Blues
26. Black Rat
27. Chauffeur Blues
28. Since I Fell for You
29. Wade in the Water
30. The Fish 

 

Big Mama Thornton was a blues singer whose songs, including "Hound Dog" and "Ball and Chain," influenced the development of the rock and roll genre.

Blues legend Big Mama Thornton was born in Ariton, Alabama on December 11, 1926. Known for her powerful voice and sexually explicit lyrics, Thornton was the original performer of the hit song "Hound Dog," commonly associated with Elvis Presley, and "Ball and Chain," covered by Janis Joplin. She died of a heart attack in Los Angeles, California, on July 25, 1984.

Willie Mae Thornton was born in Ariton, Alabama, on December 11, 1926. She was exposed to music at a young age in the church where her father was a minister, and grew up singing in its choir, along with her mother and six siblings.

When Thornton was only 14 years old, her mother died, and she took a job in a saloon to help make ends meet at home. Music promoter Sammy Green soon discovered Thornton and recruited her to join his Atlanta-based Hot Harlem Revue. She remained with the group for seven years, contributing drum and harmonica parts to the show as well as vocals. In 1948, she settled in Houston, Texas, determined to advance her career as a singer.

Thornton succeeded in making professional inroads in Houston, and in 1951 she signed a contract with Peacock Records—her first recording deal. The following year, she recorded the song "Hound Dog," which would be her biggest hit. Authorship of the song is a matter of dispute, however. Both Johnny Otis, who produced the track, and the songwriting team of Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller have claimed credit for the song. In 1953, "Hound Dog" reached number one on the R&B charts, making Thornton a star. The song was also a hit for Elvis Presley, whose 1956 cover targeted a young, white audience. Unlike Presley, however, Thornton received little compensation for her chart-topping performance.

Thornton continued to record for Peacock until 1957, touring with various performers, including Junior Parker. By the early 1960s, her fame had begun to ebb. Her follow-up hits with Peacock—including "I Smell a Rat" and "The Fish"—failed to take off as "Hound Dog" had. Thornton left Houston and settled in San Francisco, where she continued to perform locally. Popular interest in folk and blues music, beginning in the mid-1960s, helped revived Thornton's career, and in 1965 she toured Europe as part of the American Folk Blues Festival. She performed at the Monterey Jazz Festival in 1966 and 1968.

As with "Hound Dog," Thornton achieved greater recognition for her work when a white artist covered it. Janis Joplin's performance of Thornton's "Ball and Chain" at the 1967 Monterey Jazz Festival raised mainstream interest in Thornton. In 1969, she signed with Mercury Records and released her most commercially successful work. She continued to play the festival circuit, including two major performances at the Newport Jazz Festival.

Thornton was known for her tough demeanor as well as her stocky frame and powerful voice. She dressed in men's clothing and drank heavily throughout her adult life. Her drinking may have contributed to her death of a heart attack in Los Angeles, California, on July 25, 1984. She was 57 years old. Her funeral was attended by many blues greats and officiated by her old Peacock Records collaborator, Johnny Otis, who had since been ordained as a minister.

In 1984, Thornton was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame. Her song "Ball and Chain" appears in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame list of "500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll." ---biography.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Big Mama Thornton Sat, 27 Oct 2018 13:04:22 +0000
Big Mama Thornton - Ball N' Chain (1965) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/988-big-mama-thorntom/22718-big-mama-thornton-ball-n-chain-1965.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/988-big-mama-thorntom/22718-big-mama-thornton-ball-n-chain-1965.html Big Mama Thornton - Ball N' Chain (1965)

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A1 	Sweet Little Angel 	
A2 	Unlucky Girl 	
A3 	Swing It On Home 	
A4 	Little Red Rooster 	
A5 	Hound Dog 	
A6 	Your Love Is Where It Ought To Be 	
A7 	School Boy 	
A8 	My Heavy Load 	
B1 	I'm Feeling Alright 	
B2 	Sometimes I Have A Heartache 	
B3 	Black Rat 	
B4 	Life Goes On 	
B5 	Bumble Bee 	
B6 	Gimme A Penny 	
B7 	Wade In The Water 	
B8 	Ball 'N' Chain

Bass – Curtis Tillman (tracks: 9 to 14), Jimmie Lee Robinson (tracks: 1 to 5),
 	Luther Johnson (tracks: 9 to 14)
Drums – Francis Clay (tracks: 9 to 14), Fred Below (tracks: 1 to 5), Gus Wright (tracks: 9 to 14)
Guitar – Edward "Bee" Houston (tracks: 15, 16), Buddy Guy (tracks: 1 to 5),
 	Fred McDowell (tracks: 7, 8), Muddy Waters (tracks: 9 to 14), Samuel Lawhorn (tracks: 9 to 14)
Harmonica – James Cotton (tracks: 9 to 14), Walter Horton (tracks: 2, 5)
Piano – Nathaniel Dove (tracks: 9 to 14), Otis Spann (tracks: 9 to 14)
Piano, Organ – Eddie Boyd (tracks: 1 to 5)
Tenor Saxophone – Everett Minor (tracks: 9 to 14)
Vocals – Big Mama Thornton
Vocals, Harmonica, Drums – Big Mama Thornton (tracks: 6)

 

Arhoolie's Ball n' Chain is a terrific collection of late-'60s recordings from Big Mama Thornton. Supported on various tracks by Lightnin' Hopkins and Larry Williams, Big Mama runs through such familiar items as "Hound Dog," "Sometimes I Have a Heartache," "Sweet Little Angel," "Little Red Rooster," "Wade in the Water," and "Ball and Chain," turning in generally powerful performances. By and large, these don't necessarily rival her classic '50s recordings, but they are worth investigating if you're looking for something more. --- Thom Owens

 

Willie Mae "Big Mama" Thornton (December 11, 1926 – July 25, 1984) was an American rhythm and blues singer and songwriter. She was the first to record the hit song "Hound Dog" in 1952. The song was #1 on the Billboard R&B charts for seven weeks in 1953. The B-side was "They Call Me Big Mama," and the single sold almost two million copies. Three years later, Elvis Presley recorded his version, based on a version performed by Freddie Bell and the Bellboys. In a similar occurrence, she wrote and recorded "Ball 'n' Chain," which became a hit for her. In 1965 she performed with the American Folk Blues Festival package in Europe. While in England that year, she recorded Big Mama Thornton in Europe and followed it up the next year in San Francisco with Big Mama Thornton with the Chicago Blues Band. Both albums came out on the Arhoolie label. Thornton continued to record for Vanguard, Mercury, and other small labels in the 1970s and to work the blues festival circuit until her death in 1984, the same year she was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame.

During her career, she appeared on stages from New York City's Apollo Theater in 1952 to the Newport Jazz Festival in 1980, and was nominated for the Blues Music Awards six times. In addition to "Ball 'n' Chain" and "They Call Me Big Mama," Thornton wrote twenty other blues songs.

In the 1970s years of heavy drinking began to hurt Thornton's health. She was in a serious auto accident but recovered to perform at the 1983 Newport Jazz Festival with Muddy Waters, B.B. King, and Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson, a recording of which is called The Blues—A Real Summit Meeting on Buddha Records.

Thornton died of a heart attack in Los Angeles on July 25, 1984, at age 57. ---bmansbluesreport.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Big Mama Thornton Thu, 14 Dec 2017 15:33:04 +0000
Big Mama Thornton - Stronger than dirt (1969) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/988-big-mama-thorntom/22094-big-mama-thornton-stronger-than-dirt-1969.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/988-big-mama-thorntom/22094-big-mama-thornton-stronger-than-dirt-1969.html Big Mama Thornton - Stronger than dirt (1969)

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A1	 Born Under a Bad Sign 3:40
A2	 Hound Dog 2:27
A3	 Ball and Chain 4:30
A4	 Summertime 4:14
A5	 Rollin' Stone 3:55
B1	 Let's Go Get Stoned 4:25
B2	 Funky Broadway 4:18
B3	 That Lucky Old Sun 3:30
B4	 Ain't Nothin' You Can Do 3:37
B5	 I Shall Be Released 4:34

 

This is one of my favorite albums ever. I bought it at the time because of my love for Janis Joplin & wanted to hear the woman that had had such an affect on her. The album was made on the heels of Cheap Thrills as a comeback but never achieved the success she hoped for. It includes a remake of Hound Dog Man & Ball & Chain, as well as a version of Summertime that Joplin had covered earlier. All of them are strong sets comparable to her earlier versions. The rest is material that is chosen wisely.

Her version of That Lucky Old Sun, to me, is one of the great songs of transcendent honesty. She lets you feel the truth of life & it's burden. It was the first time, at the age of 18, that I "got" the blues. I understood & more than likely it was the first time I realized it was never going to be easy on this earth, but that it was endurable. The title of the album itself says this very thing.

Her version of I Shall Be released, has much the same feel, & is to my mind, the most interesting arrangement of the song. It's always been the one Dylan song I found great & has been covered well by many. To me this is the best. It is the one & only time that this song swings & when she belts out "You know, Big Mama, I was framed" you know she knows exactly what he's talking about. She expounds the universal.

The album starts off with Born Under A Bad Sign, another song that she was born to sing. It's material she has lived. All the songs on this album are good, not a filler in the lot & all are handled by her with ease. It's clear it's all material she enjoyed giving her Big Mama interpretation to, from Funky Broadway to Let's Go Get Stoned to Rollin' Stone to Ain't Nothin' You Can Do. This is her strongest outing in the studio.

There seems to be almost a contradiction in the fact that here was this big voice that came out effortlessly. Something that, no matter how good she was, Joplin did not have. It took a lot of effort & burned her out. Big Mama despite living the blues was never buried in them. She knew how to let the good times roll, specifically, because she knew how hard it could be. On this album, after years of obscurity she's enjoying the attention that's finally come back to her, rolling up her sleeves & saying: "This is what they're talking about, here's the treasure. This is what you've been missing." ---Robido, rateyourmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Big Mama Thornton Wed, 16 Aug 2017 14:20:47 +0000
Big Mama Thornton – Jail (live) [1975] http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/988-big-mama-thorntom/9609-big-mama-thornton-jail-live-1975.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/988-big-mama-thorntom/9609-big-mama-thornton-jail-live-1975.html Big Mama Thornton – Jail (live) [1975]

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01. Little Red Rooster	play
02. Ball 'n' Chain
03. Jail
04. Hound Dog		play
05. Rock Me Baby
06. Sheriff O.E. & Me
07. Oh Happy Day

Line-Up:
Big Mama Thornton - Vocals
Steve Wachsman - Guitar
George "Harmonica" Smith - Harmonica
Todd Nelson - Drums
Bill Potter - Saxophone
J.D. Nichols - Piano 
Bruce Sieverson – Bass

 

It's ironic that blues great Big Mama Thornton is most famous for originating songs that later became associated with other singers. Her sole R&B hit, which never made the pop charts, became Elvis Presley's "Hound Dog" in most listeners' minds, just as surely as Otis Redding's "Respect" was universally credited to Aretha Franklin. It must have seemed like déjà vu when Thornton's "Ball and Chain" became known to most music lovers via Janis Joplin's version with Big Brother & the Holding Company. Nevertheless, Thornton has rarely had trouble reclaiming these and other compositions once onstage, and Jail vividly captures her gruff charm during a couple of mid-'70s gigs at two northwestern prisons. As a live album, Jail works largely because Thornton gives her musicians plenty of room to improvise, especially on six-minute versions of "Little Red Rooster" and "Ball and Chain." In her spoken introduction to "Ball and Chain," Thornton initially gives props to Janis Joplin, then reminds the audience, "I wrote this song." Having lost little of her commanding, masculine voice, Thornton becomes the talented leader of a gritty blues ensemble that features sustained jams from George "Harmonica" Smith and guitarists B. Huston and Steve Wachsman. Despite several lengthy numbers, the running time is less than 40 minutes, and there's not much between-song banter à la Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison. Listeners who are left wanting more Big Mama Thornton can invest in The Complete Vanguard Recordings, a triple-CD set that includes all of Jail and two albums from the same era: Sassy Mama and the previously unreleased Big Mama Swings. ---Vince Ripol. AMG.

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Big Mama Thornton Sun, 03 Jul 2011 15:45:17 +0000
Big Mama Thornton With The Muddy Waters Blues Band (1966) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/988-big-mama-thorntom/7997-big-mama-thornton-with-the-muddy-waters-blues-band-1966.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/988-big-mama-thorntom/7997-big-mama-thornton-with-the-muddy-waters-blues-band-1966.html Big Mama Thornton With The Muddy Waters Blues Band (1966)

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1. I'm Feeling Alright 3:01
2. Sometimes I have a Heartache 3:49
3. Black Rat (take 4) 2:52
4. Life Goes On 3:27
5. Everything Gonna Be Alright 5:05 play
6. Big Mama's Bumble Bee Blues 4:13
7. Gimme A Penny (take 6) 4:38
8. Looking The World Over 2:12
9. I Feel The Way I Feel 5:04
10. Guide Me Home 4:23
11. Black Rat (take 2) 2:52
12. Wrapped Tight 3:18
13. Gimme A Penny (take 5) 3:59
14. Big Mama's Shuffle 3:38
15. Since I fell For You 4:32 play
16. I'm Feeling Alright (fast version) 2:27
17. Big Mama's Blues (My Love) 4:08

Personnel:
Big Mama Thornton (vocals, harmonica, drums);
Big Mama Thornton; James Cotton (harmonica);
Luther "Houserocker" Johnson (bass guitar);
Muddy Waters, Sammy Lawhorn (guitar);
Otis Spann (piano);
Francis Clay (drums).

 

In the mid- '60s, Big Mama Thornton was a relatively obscure blues singer known mainly for her original recording of "Hound Dog" in 1953, three years before Elvis had a monster hit with it. Due to a lack of gigs, Thornton had a tough time keeping a steady band on the road and would scramble to gather consistently decent musicians. Fortunately, Arhoolie Records' founder and president Chris Strachwitz had witnessed an amazing performance of the era which had Thornton backed by a group of Chicago musicians who included Buddy Guy on guitar. With that performance in mind, Strachwitz was determined to capture that excellence in the studio. He offered the gig to Muddy Waters, whom he met in San Francisco a few days prior to this session. Muddy accepted and brought with him James Cotton (harmonica), Otis Spann (piano), Sammy Lawhorn (guitar), Luther "Guitar Junior" Johnson (bass), and Francis Clay (drums). What came out at Coast Recorders on April 25, 1966 is presented on this 17-track disc including seven previously unreleased cuts. From the low-down gutbucket blues of "Black Rat," and "Big Mama's Shuffle" (featuring both Thornton and James Cotton engaging in a battle of the harps), to the hazy, late-night atmosphere of "Life Goes On," "Since I Fell for You," and "I Feel the Way I Feel," all of this material is absolutely timeless. One can only imagine what would have happened if Big Mama's hopes of recording a gospel album with this band had been fulfilled. ---Al Campbell, AllMusic Review

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Big Mama Thornton Sun, 23 Jan 2011 10:41:44 +0000
Big Mama Thornton Chicago All Stars Muddy Water’s Blues Band 1965 – 1966 http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/988-big-mama-thorntom/2627-big-mama-thornton-muddy-waters.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/988-big-mama-thorntom/2627-big-mama-thornton-muddy-waters.html Big Mama Thornton Chicago All Stars Muddy Water’s Blues Band 1965 – 1966

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01. Swing It On Home
02. Sweet Little Angel
03. Little Red Rooster
04. Unlucky Girl
05. Hound Dog
06. My Heavy Road
07. School Boy
08. Down-Home Shakedown
09. Your Love Is Where It Ought To Be
10. Session Blues

Recorded in London, October 20, 1965.

Big Mama Thornton- Vocals, Harmonica on tracks 8 & 9 and Drums on track 9 & 10
Shakey Horton- Harmonica on tracks 4, 5, 8 & 10
Eddie Boyd- Piano & Organ
Buddy Guy- Guitar
Jimmy Lee Robinson- Bass
Fred Below- Drums
Fred McDowell- Guitar on track 6 & 7

11. I’m Feeling Alright
12. Sometimes I Have A Heartache
13. Black Rat
14. Life Goes On
15. Everything Gonna Be Alright
16. Bumble Bee
17. Looking The World Over
18. I Feel The Way I Feel
19. My Love

With Muddy Water’s Blues Band - 1966
Recorded in San Francisco, April 25, 1966

Big Mama Thornton- Vocals and Drums on track 15
James Cotton- Harmonica
Muddy Waters- Guitar
Sammy Lowhom- Guitar
Luther Johnson- Bass
Francis Clay- Drums

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Big Mama Thornton Wed, 09 Dec 2009 18:29:08 +0000
Big Mama Thornton – The Rising Sun Collection (1994) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/988-big-mama-thorntom/2626-the-rising-sun-collection.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/988-big-mama-thorntom/2626-the-rising-sun-collection.html Big Mama Thornton – The Rising Sun Collection (1994)

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01. Spoonful 5:30
02. Rock Me Baby 6:43
03. Ball And Chain 7:13
04. Watermelon Man 4:30
05. Summertime 6:32 254
06. Medley: Hound Dog/Walkin' The Dog 4:11
07. Sweet Little Angel 5:29
08. Sassy Mama 4:53

Big Mama Thornton- (Harmonica, Vocals),
John Primer- (Guitar),
Johnny Big Moose Walker- (Piano),
J.W. Williams- (Bass).

 

Rising Sun Collection features Big Mama on foreign soil with a good band behind her playing for the Euros in 1977. With Phil Guy and John Primer on guitar, and Johnny "Big Moose" Walker on piano, the band is truly kicking behind her as Willie Mae stretches out the tunes to a comfortable length. The tunes are old standards like "Spoonful," "Rock Me Baby," "Summertime," "Sweet Little Angel," and the inevitable "Ball and Chain," as well as the "Hound Dog-Walkin' The Dog" medley. As these kind of old tapes go, this is pretty inspired stuff and Big Mama is in good form throughout. ---Cub Koda, allmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Big Mama Thornton Wed, 09 Dec 2009 18:26:10 +0000
Big Mama Thornton – The Original Hound Dog (1990) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/988-big-mama-thorntom/2625-the-original-hound-dog.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/blues/988-big-mama-thorntom/2625-the-original-hound-dog.html p>Big Mama Thornton – The Original Hound Dog (1990)

 

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01. Hound Dog 2:52
02. Walking Blues 3:01
03. My Man Called Me 2:39
04. Cotton Picking Blues 2:49
05. Willie Mae's Trouble 2:42
06. The Big Change 2:44
07. I Smell a Rat 1:43
08. I Just Can't Help Myself 2:56
09. They Call Me Big Mama 2:05
10. Hard Times 2:14
11. I Ain't No Fool Either 2:22
12. You Don't Move Me No More 2:44
13. Let Your Tears Fall Baby 2:47
14. I've Searched The World Over 2:38
15. Rock-A-Bye Baby 2:36
16. How Come 2:36
17. Nightmare 2:53
18. Stop A-Hoppin' on Me 2:27
19. Laugh, Laugh, Laugh 2:44
20. Just Like A Dog 2:47
21. The Fish 2:43
22. Mischievous Boogie 2:31

 

This British import compilation of Peacock sides is a bit more comprehensive than the domestic Hound Dog anthology, including a few more tracks (22 in all, some previously unreleased). The MCA collection, more readily available for most North American consumers, should suffice for most listeners. If you come across this one first, though, it's certainly an equal or greater value, highlighted by "Hound Dog" and "I Smell a Rat" (both written by the Leiber-Stoller songwriting team in their early days). --- Richie Unterberger, allmusic.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Big Mama Thornton Wed, 09 Dec 2009 18:22:41 +0000