Jazz The best music site on the web there is where you can read about and listen to blues, jazz, classical music and much more. This is your ultimate music resource. Tons of albums can be found within. http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/jazz/1345.html Fri, 01 Jul 2022 01:25:12 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management pl-pl Wolfert Brederode Quartet - Post Scriptum (2011) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/jazz/1345-wolfert-brederode/18030-wolfert-brederode-quartet-post-scriptum-2011.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/jazz/1345-wolfert-brederode/18030-wolfert-brederode-quartet-post-scriptum-2011.html Wolfert Brederode Quartet - Post Scriptum (2011)

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01. Meander [06:18] 
02. Angelico [05:25] 
03. November [06:49] 
04. Post Scriptum [03:08] 
05. Hybrids [05:38] 
06. Inner Dance [04:55] 
07. Aceh [05:38] 
08. Post Scriptum, var. [03:27] 
09. Brun [03:54] 
10. Sofja [03:35] 
11. Augenblick in der Garderobe des Sommers [04:28] 
12. Silver Cloud [05:29] 
13. Wall View [05:25] 
14. Silver Cloud, var. [02:52]

Wolfert Brederode - Piano
Mats Eilertsen - Double Bass
Claudio Puntin - Clarinet
Samuel Rohrer - Drums

 

Dutch pianist Wolfert Brederode, on his second formal quartet outing (following 2007's Currents), leads his compatriots, clarinetist Claudio Puntin, bassist Mats Eilertsen, and drummer Samuel Rohrer, in a selection of thoughtful, classically influenced jazz on Post Scriptum. The instrumentation may suggest the Dave Brubeck Quartet with Paul Desmond, but if Brubeck represented a brand of "college jazz" in the 1950s and ‘60s, this is strictly graduate school stuff. Brederode and company are on the right label with producer Manfred Eicher's ECM, since they are playing very much in the ECM school of cool European jazz. That's apparent immediately on the appropriately named opener, "Meander," which finds Puntin making like a more laid-back yet freer Desmond in a Brederode composition that will suggest new age to many listeners. Those tendencies continue throughout the disc, although the playing tends to be a little too complex and unpredictable for the new age tag to adhere firmly. The tempos are mostly slow, sometimes extremely so, but "Inner Dance," as its title indicates, has a real rhythm provided by Eilertsen and Rohrer, who otherwise imply beats rather than actually playing them. This is music for the more adventurous jazz listener who is willing to consider improvisatory playing that brings in ambient and contemporary classical aspects. --- William Ruhlmann, Rovi

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Wolfert Brederode Fri, 03 Jul 2015 15:55:54 +0000
Wolfert Brederode Quartet – Currents (2007) http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/jazz/1345-wolfert-brederode/3838-wolfert-brederode-quartet-currents-2007.html http://www.theblues-thatjazz.com/pl/jazz/1345-wolfert-brederode/3838-wolfert-brederode-quartet-currents-2007.html Wolfert Brederode Quartet – Currents (2007)

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01. Common Fields (8:31)
02. Empty Room (6:30)
03. As You July Me (5:00)
04. High And Low (5:42)
05. With Them (3:09)
06. Frost Flower (5:06)
07. Scarabee (5:49)
08. Desiderata (4:58)
09. Soil (4:03)
10. Ebb (5:08)
11. Barcelona (3:19)

Claudio Puntin - (clarinets)
Wolfert Brederode - (piano)
Mats Eilertsen - (double-bass)
Samuel Rohrer - (drums)

 

Along with Norwegian trumpeter Mathias Eick's first disc as a leader, The Door, ECM's North American release of pianist Wolfert Brederode's debut on the same day is more than happenstance. At 34, Brederode is a few years older than Eick, but the two share much in common. Both are firmly committed to melody as a strong stylistic definer and both have already recorded for the label, in Brederode's case with singer Susanne Abbuehl on two albums including the emotionally far-reaching yet ever-understated Compass (2006). With Brederode's line-up on Currents mirroring that of Abbuehl's group—piano, clarinets and drums, but here expanded to a quartet with the addition of Norwegian bassist Mats Eilertsen—it would be safe to assume certain aesthetic similarities. Still, with Brederode as the primary composer, there are plenty of differences as well.

Recruiting drummer Samuel Rohrer from Abbuehl's April (ECM, 2001), creates yet another reference point to the Swiss-born/Holland-resident singer's less-is-more approach. Rohrer may excel as a textural sound painter, but he's also an undeniably rhythmic player—oftentimes more implicitly so. On the opening "Common Fields," driven by Brederode's gradually evolving arpeggios, he works in kind, a light but propulsive cymbal providing forward motion reminiscent of a young Jon Christensen, but intensifying through the gradual introduction of the rest of his kit, creating a turbulent undercurrent that's more expressionistic than anything found in Abbuehl's work.

By substituting Claudio Puntin on clarinets rather than Abbuehl reedman Christof May, Brederode aims for a complexion as melody-centric as The Door but, with Puntin's contrapuntal exploratory élan, the pianist approaches improvisation from a more contemporary classical frame of reference. Puntin—who may not be a familiar name to many ECM fans but whose duet disc with Icelandic singer/violist Gerður Gunnarsdótir, Ýlir (ECM, 2001), remains an underappreciated treasure—interacts with Brederode on near chromosomal levels, whether on the poignant yet harmonically offsetting "Empty Room" or the brooding and introspective "As You July Me," a collaboration by Brederode and Abbuehl that features Puntin's dark-hued bass clarinet.

Eilertsen—another familiar ECM face from guitarist Jacob Young's Sideways (2007), electroacoustic percussionist Thomas Strønen's Parish (2006) and The Source's self-titled 2006 release—is, like Rohrer, a player equally capable of melodic counterpoint and nuanced color as he is a more conventional anchor, in some cases all at once. Across the broad dynamics of "High & Low," the bassist's rich, woody tone brings sonic focus to the coalescing streams around him.

Throughout, Brederode's writing and playing demonstrates visible markers of some of ECM's classic groups—Jan Garbarek/Bobo Stenson Quartet, Keith Jarrett's European Quartet, John Abercrombie's quartet with Richie Beirach and Ralph Towner's Solstice group—while sounding like none of them. Currrents' vivid ebb and flow makes it an apt title, and presents an alternative but no less fervent melodic intent to Eick's The Door, suggesting that their concurrent release is anything but a coincidence. ---John Kelman, allaboutjazz.com

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administration@theblues-thatjazz.com (bluesever) Wolfert Brederode Wed, 10 Mar 2010 23:30:22 +0000