Feel the Blues with all that Jazz
English (United Kingdom)Polish (Poland)
Home Blues John Oates John Oates - Mississippi Mile (2011)

John Oates - Mississippi Mile (2011)

User Rating: / 0
PoorBest 

John Oates - Mississippi Mile (2011)

Image could not be displayed. Check browser for compatibility.


1 	Mississippi Mile 	
2 	Let It Rock 	
3 	It's All Right 	
4 	Please Send Me Someone To Love 	
5 	All Shook Up 	
6 	Pallet 	
7 	Searchin' 	
8 	Come Back Baby 	
9 	Deep River 	
10 	He Was A Friend Of Mine 	
11 	You Make My Dreams Come True 	
12 	Dance Hall Girls

Bekka Bramlett 	Vocals
Sam Bush 	Fiddle, Mandolin
Dennis Crouch 	Bass (Upright)
Jerry Douglas 	Dobro, Lap Steel Guitar
John Gardner 	Drums
Mike Henderson 	Guitar (Electric), Harp, Producer, Slide Guitar
Pete Huttlinger 	Guitar (Acoustic), Guitar (Electric)
Michael Jude 	Vocals (Background)
Jed Leiber 	Hammond B3
Kevin McKendree 	Piano
John Michel 	Tambourine, Vocals (Background)
John Oates 	Guitar (Acoustic), Guitar (Electric), Producer, Vocals
Michael Rhodes 	Bass (Electric) 

 

For his third solo album, John Oates decided to pay tribute to the blues and R&B that originated in the Mississippi Delta, taking considerable liberty in his definition of the Delta by letting it encompass Chuck Berry’s rock & roll, the Coasters’ jiving cool, the Impressions' slick uptown groove, and Percy Mayfield’s smoky late-night balladry. Only sticklers will gripe about Oates bending the borders of the blues because history has shown that he’s never been a purist; he’s always fused different sounds and styles, which is precisely what he does here, grounding himself in an easy-rolling bluesy roots music that can encompass all manner of R&B, from a reworking of Elvis Presley’s “All Shook Up” to a dynamic reinterpretation of Oates’ own “You Make My Dreams Come True.” It’s a setting far more stripped-down than he’s usually performed within -- lots of acoustic guitars, Dobros, and mandolins -- and the band locks into its rhythm with ease. Plus, there’s actually a bit of sandpaper grit to Oates’ voice -- maybe not enough to make this a down-and-dirty hoedown, but enough to give it soulfulness, enough to keep it from grooving a little too smoothly. Parts of Mississippi Mile hark back to Oates’ folky beginnings -- Hall & Oates covered “Deep River Blues” early on and he reworks the song here -- but it’s a unique record in his career, not just in how it puts an emphasis on blues and folk over soul but how it captures him performing with a relaxed authority that’s quite appealing. ---Stephen Thomas Erlewine, AllMusic Review

download (mp3 @320 kbs):

yandex mediafire uloz.to mega 4shared cloudmailru gett

 

back

 

Before downloading any file you are required to read and accept the
Terms and Conditions.

If you are an artist or agent, and would like your music removed from this site,
please e-mail us on
abuse@theblues-thatjazz.com
and we will remove them as soon as possible.


Polls
What music genre would you like to find here the most?
 
Now onsite:
  • 188 guests
Content View Hits : 52076350