Feel the Blues with all that Jazz
English (United Kingdom)Polish (Poland)
Home Classical Rachmaninov Sergei Rachmaninov – Piano Concertos (Ashkenazy) [1995]

Rachmaninov – Piano Concertos (Ashkenazy) [1995]

User Rating: / 1
PoorBest 

Rachmaninov – Piano Concertos (Ashkenazy) [1995]

CD 1:

1. Piano Concerto No.1 in F sharp minor, Op.1 - 1. Vivace
2. Piano Concerto No.1 in F sharp minor, Op.1 - 2. Andante
3. Piano Concerto No.1 in F sharp minor, Op.1 - 3. Allegro vivace
4. Piano Concerto No.2 in C minor, Op.18 - 1. Moderato
5. Piano Concerto No.2 in C minor, Op.18 - 2. Adagio sostenuto
6. Piano Concerto No.2 in C minor, Op.18 - 3. Allegro scherzando

CD 2:

1. Piano Concerto No.3 in D minor, Op.30 - 1. Allegro ma non tanto
2. Piano Concerto No.3 in D minor, Op.30 - 2. Intermezzo (Adagio)
3. Piano Concerto No.3 in D minor, Op.30 - 3. Finale (Alla breve)
4. Piano Concerto No.4 in G minor, Op.40 - 1. Allegro vivace (Alla breve)
5. Piano Concerto No.4 in G minor, Op.40 - 2. Largo
6. Piano Concerto No.4 in G minor, Op.40 - 3. Allegro vivace

Vladimir Ashkenazy – piano
London Symphony Orchestra
André Previn – conductor

Recorded 1970-72

 

Despite the recording dates, the sound and balance are superb, and there’s nothing to cloud your sense of Ashkenazy’s greatness in all these works. From him every page declares Rachmaninov’s nationality, his indelibly Russian nature. What nobility of feeling and what dark regions of the imagination he relishes and explores in page after page of the Third Concerto. Significantly his opening is a very moderate Allegro ma non tanto, later allowing him an expansiveness and imaginative scope hard to find in other more ‘driven’ or hectic performances. His rubato is as natural as it’s distinctive, and his way of easing from one idea to another shows him at his most intimately and romantically responsive. There are no cuts, and his choice of the bigger of the two cadenzas is entirely apt, given the breadth of his conception. Even the skittering figurations and volleys of repeated notes just before the close of the central Intermezzo can’t tempt Ashkenazy into display and he’s quicker than any other pianist to find a touch of wistfulness beneath Rachmaninov’s occasional outer playfulness (the scherzando episode in the finale).

Such imaginative fervour and delicacy are just as central to Ashkenazy’s other performances. His steep unmarked decrescendo at the close of the First Concerto’s opening rhetorical gesture is symptomatic of his Romantic bias, his love of the music’s interior glow. And despite his prodigious command in, say, the final pages of both the First and Fourth Concertos, there’s never a hint of bombast or a more superficial brand of fire-and-brimstone virtuosity. Previn works hand in glove with his soloist. Clearly, this is no one-night partnership but the product of the greatest musical sympathy. The opening of the Third Concerto’s Intermezzo could hardly be given with a more idiomatic, brooding melancholy, a perfect introduction for all that’s to follow. If you want playing which captures Rachmaninov’s always elusive, opalescent centre then Ashkenazy is hard to beat. --- gramophone.co.uk

download: uploaded yandex 4shared mediafire solidfiles mega filecloudio nornar

back

Last Updated (Saturday, 29 March 2014 15:44)

 

Before downloading any file you are required to read and accept the
Terms and Conditions.

If you are an artist or agent, and would like your music removed from this site,
please e-mail us on
abuse@theblues-thatjazz.com
and we will remove them as soon as possible.


Polls
What music genre would you like to find here the most?
 
Now onsite:
  • 271 guests
Content View Hits : 235617846